Maine Governor Meets with the Independent Legislative Caucus

This article describes a meeting that Maine Governor Paul LePage held with the three independent members of the Maine legislature who do not caucus with either major party. Although the thrust of the article is that the meeting did not go very cordially, a more important point is that the Governor at least met with the independents. Also it is significant that three of the four independents in the Maine legislature have their own caucus, and do not caucus with either major party. Thanks to Thomas MacMillan for the link.


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Maine Governor Meets with the Independent Legislative Caucus — No Comments

  1. If you don’t caucus with either side though, what kind of power can you have? Do you get to serve on committees? Do you get any speaking time? I’m curious to how this works, and if say an independent/minor party candidate got elected to the U.S. House, and didn’t caucus with either side, how that would work.

  2. If you don’t caucus with either side though, what kind of power can you have? Do you get to serve on committees? Do you get any speaking time? I’m curious to how this works, and if say an independent/minor party candidate got elected to the U.S. House, and didn’t caucus with either side, how that would work.

  3. Hey that’s neat that they are forming their own caucus. If enough independents are elected they could be a powerful party in Maine. Just as the greens are trying to do in Maine.

  4. Hey that’s neat that they are forming their own caucus. If enough independents are elected they could be a powerful party in Maine. Just as the greens are trying to do in Maine.

  5. Mr. Chipman, I believe, was once a Independent Green Party member. He really should return to them. Portland, Maine has a strong Green Party its a shame he doesn’t stand with them.

  6. Mr. Chipman, I believe, was once a Independent Green Party member. He really should return to them. Portland, Maine has a strong Green Party its a shame he doesn’t stand with them.

  7. An “independent caucus” could mean even less than the Democratic or Republican caucuses. Independents by definition are just that… independent. They may have nothing in common with other elected independents other than lack of party affiliation. They could range all over the political spectrum.

  8. An “independent caucus” could mean even less than the Democratic or Republican caucuses. Independents by definition are just that… independent. They may have nothing in common with other elected independents other than lack of party affiliation. They could range all over the political spectrum.

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