May 2016 Ballot Access News Print Edition

Ballot Access News
May 1, 2016 – Volume 31, Number 12

This issue was printed on white paper.


Table of Contents

  1. OKLAHOMA LEGISLATURE PASSES BILL TO EASE VOTE TEST FOR PARTY RETENTION FROM 10% to 2.5%
  2. VERMONT EASES DEADLINE
  3. OKLAHOMA TAKES ELECTORS OFF BALLOT
  4. THREE PENNSYLVANIA PARTIES ASK JUDGE TO PUT THEM ON BALLOT
  5. PENNSYLVANIA WIN
  6. JUDGE UPHOLDS DISCRIMINATORY CALIFORNIA BALLOT LABELS
  7. MAINE COURT DENIES LIBERTARIANS
  8. OTHER LAWSUIT NEWS
  9. CONSTITUTION PARTY PRESIDENTIAL CONVENTION VOTE
  10. 2016 PETITIONING FOR PRESIDENT
  11. PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY CANDIDATES WHO GOT ON BALLOTS IN MARCH & APRIL
  12. JILL STEIN AWARDED PRIMARY SEASON MATCHING FUNDS
  13. SOCIALIST EQUALITY TICKET
  14. ANTI-TRUMP REPUBLICANS HOPE TO RECRUIT GENERAL MATTIS TO RUN AS INDEPENDENT CANDIDATE
  15. LIBERTARIAN WINS NON-PARTISAN OFFICE IN SOUTH DAKOTA
  16. CONGRESSIONAL CANDIDATE QUALFIES IN TWO STATES
  17. AMERICAN INDEPENDENT PARTY GETS MUCH PUBLICITY
  18. SUBSCRIBING TO BAN WITH PAYPAL

OKLAHOMA LEGISLATURE PASSES BILL TO EASE VOTE TEST FOR PARTY RETENTION FROM 10% to 2.5%

On April 28, the Oklahoma legislature passed SB 896. It eases the vote for a party to remain on the ballot. The old law says a party that polls under 10% for the office at the top of the ticket (president in presidential years; governor in mid-term years) goes off the ballot. SB 896 lowers the 10% to 2.5%.

The bill had passed the Senate on March 10, by 42-1. Then, on March 31, the House had passed the bill by 69-15, but the House amended the bill. The amendment changed the effective date from January 1, 2017, to November 1, 2016, to make it clear that if the Libertarian Party (the only third party on the ballot this year so far) gets 2.5% for President in 2016, then the party will remain on the ballot for 2018. Because of this amendment, though, the bill had to return to the Senate for another vote,

The Senate passed the bill again on April 28, by 26-14. Apparently some Senators who had voted for the bill in March changed their mind, but fortunately the bill still had enough support to win.

If Governor Mary Fallin signs the bill, the only states with a 10% vote test will be New Jersey and Virginia. There are two states above 10%: Alabama is 20%; Pennsylvania is registration of 15%. All other states are at or below 5%. The median vote test of the 50 states is 2%.

It is rare for a Libertarian presidential nominee to poll as much as 2.5% in any state, but not impossible, especially in the current environment, with so many voters telling pollsters they don’t like any of the likely major party presidential nominees. In 2012 the Libertarian Party got 3.55% for President in New Mexico, 2.93% in Montana, and 2.48% in Alaska.

Assuming the bill ia signed into law, Oklahoma will be the 32nd state that has made it easier for a party to remain on the ballot in the last 47 years.


VERMONT EASES DEADLINE

On April 26, the Vermont Secretary of State ruled that, in effect, qualified minor parties may have until September, not May, to tell the state who their presidential and vice-presidential candidates are.

The Secretary of State can’t change the law unilaterally, and the law says that qualified minor parties must tell the state who their presidential candiates are by May 26, whereas the major parties need not reveal this until September 14. But the Secretary of State said he will let minor parties submit stand-in candidates by the May deadline, and then if those stand-ins withdraw later, the actual candidates can be substituted.

The Libertarian Party and Liberty Union are the only two qualified minor parties. Libertarians asked for this ruling because their national ticket this year is not chosen until May 29, two days after the deadline.

The Secretary of State will ask the legislature to change the law so that all qualified parties have the same September deadline.


OKLAHOMA TAKES ELECTORS OFF BALLOT

On April 11, Oklahoma SB 1108 was signed into law. It takes the names of presidential elector candidates off the ballot. Only four states still print their names on the ballot: Arizona, Idaho, North Dakota, and South Dakota. Removing electors makes for a more compact ballot.


THREE PENNSYLVANIA PARTIES ASK JUDGE TO PUT THEM ON BALLOT

On April 26, the Constitution, Green, and Libertarian Parties asked a U.S. District Court to put them on the November 2016 Pennsylvaniaballot. The basis for the request is that the existing ballot access laws were invalidated in July 2015, and the legislature hasn’t passed any bill to replace the old law.

A similar request in Ohio in 2008 resulted in the Libertarian and Socialist Parties being placed on the ballot by court order. The old Ohio law had been struck down in September 2006 and the legislature had not replaced it. After the 2008 court order, the Ohio Secretary of State also put the Constitution and Green Parties on the ballot.

One basis for the request for these three particular parties is that they have shown a modicum of support in Pennsylvania. The court filing emphasizes that they have a sizeable number of registered members in Pennsylvania. Another basis is that they have been on the ballot in recent past elections and polled sizeable votes.


PENNSYLVANIA WIN

On April 19, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court unanimously reversed the Commonwealth Court, and ruled that signatures on petitions are valid, even if the signer had moved within the county and had not re-registered to vote at the new address. In re Nominating Petition of Joseph Vodvarka, J-75-2016. As a result, Joseph Vodvarka was restored to the Democratic primary ballot for U.S. Senate, only one week before the primary.


JUDGE UPHOLDS DISCRIMINATORY CALIFORNIA BALLOT LABELS

On April 22, U.S. District Court Judge Andre Birotte, an Obama appointee, upheld California law that won’t let a candidate for Congress or partisan state office have a party label on the ballot, unless the candidate is a member of a qualified party. Soltysik v Padilla, cd cv-15-7916.

The plaintiffs are two Socialists. Because the Socialist Party is not a qualified party, when they run for partisan office, their ballot label is "Party preference: none." They argued that the state is forcing them to lie. They do have a party preference; they prefer the Socialist Party.

Judge Birotte said the election code defines "party" as a qualified party, and therefore the statement is true. But he ignored a contrary statement by the U.S. Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit, which said in Chamness v Bowen, 722 F. 3d 1110 (2013), that requiring candidates who prefer a non-qualified party forces them to "falsely state that they have no party preference." The Chamness case was about whether California could legitimately force independent candidates to be listed on the ballot as "Party preference: none."

The 9th circuit said in Chamness that "independent" and "party preference: none" mean the same thing, so the policy is not unconstitutional as to independents. But the Chamness decision hinted that the law is unconstitutional as applied to members of unqualified parties. Judge Birotte ought to have addressed the Ninth Circuit’s statement.

He also ignored Supreme Court rulings that say that government must treat all candidates equally, relative to ballot labels. Cook v Gralike, 531 U.S. 510 says, "The adverse labels handicap candidates at the most crucial stage of the election process – the instant before the vote is cast…the labels surely place their targets at a political disadvantage."

Also, Bullock v Carter, 405 U.S. 134 (1972) says it is not reasonable for a state to force candidates who can’t pay a filing fee to run for office without a party label. It is likely the decision will be appealed.


MAINE COURT DENIES LIBERTARIANS

On April 25, U.S. District Court Judge John A. Woodcock, a Bush Jr. appointee, issued an order in Maine Libertarian Party v Dunlap, 2:16cv-0002. He hinted that the Maine deadline for a new party to get on the ballot is unconstitutionally early, but he said he is not now ruling on that. But he said he won’t issue an injunction putting the Libertarian Party on the 2016 ballot because that would create "chaos."

Maine requires a newly-qualifying party to have at least 5,000 registered members by December 1 of the year before the election. The Maine Libertarian Party submitted approximately 6,500 registrants by the deadline, but the state invalidated one-third of them, mostly because the applicant’s handwriting wasn’t clear, or because the applicant forgot to fill out one of the blanks. When a registration card needs further processing, the state returns the card to the applicant and lets it be re-done. However, when the Libertarian cards were re-done, the state said they don’t count because they are beyond the deadline.

Judge Woodcock said he couldn’t put the Libertarian Party on the ballot, nor give it more time to get some more registrations (which it has been doing anyway) because the primary is in June and there wouldn’t be time to hold the Libertarian primary.

He seemed not to grasp the idea that in such cases, it is normal for courts to put parties on the ballot and let them nominate by convention. This is the approach the U.S. Supreme Court took in Ohio in 1968, when it invalidated the procedures for new parties, and put the American Independent Party on the ballot.

The Ohio primary was in May that year, and the U.S. Supreme Court didn’t act until September, so the Court let the party nominate presidential electors even though Ohio law required new parties to elect party officers in the primary. Other courts did the same in Arkansas in 1996 (Reform Party); Hawaii 1986 (Libertarian); Nebraska 1976 (Libertarian); Nevada 1986 (Libertarian); Ohio 2008 (Libertarian and Socialist); Ohio 1976 (American Independent); Oklahoma 1984 (Libertarian); and Tennessee 2012 (Constitution and Green).

On April 29, the party asked for reconsideration. There is another hearing in this case on May 10.


OTHER LAWSUIT NEWS

Alaska: on April 18, a state court ruled against the Democratic Party. The party wanted a ruling that independent voters may run in Democratic primaries, but the court said that the party lacks standing because it hasn’t yet amended its bylaws to show that policy. Alaska Democratic Party v State, 1-ju-16-533. The party will re-file the case after it changes its bylaws.

Arizona: on April 12, the Libertarian party filed a federal lawsuit against the new law that vastly increases the number of signatures needed for Libertarians to get on a party primary ballot. Arizona Libertarian Party v Reagan, 1:16cv-1019.

California: on April 1, an independent candidate for U.S. Senate, Paul Merritt, filed a federal lawsuit against the Secretary of State for deleting the words "registered independent voter" from his ballot statement in the State Voters Handbook. Merritt v Padilla, c.d., SA-cv-16: 606. California sends such a booklet to all registered voters, and candidates are permitted to have a statement in that book. Merritt really is an independent voter, but California law requires him to have "party preference: none" on the ballot, and apparently the Secretary of State feels that gives him the authority to censor the candidate statement as well.


CONSTITUTION PARTY PRESIDENTIAL CONVENTION VOTE

STATE

Votes Cast

Darrell Castle

Scott Copeland

Tom Hoefling

J. R. Myers

Daniel Cummings

Don Grundmann

John Diamond

Jeremy Friedbaum

Alaska

4

0

0

0

4

0

0

0

0

Arizona

4

4

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

California

2

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

Colorado

15

9

4

0

0

0

0

0

2

Florida

39

20

19

0

0

0

0

0

0

Georgia

6

3

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

Idaho

8

0

8

0

0

0

0

0

0

Illinois

8

3

3

0

2

0

0

0

0

Indiana

5

1

1

0

0

1

2

0

0

Iowa

6

0

0

6

0

0

0

0

0

Louisiana

12

12

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Maryland

7

2

4

0

1

0

0

0

0

Michigan

25

25

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Minnesota

16

8

8

0

0

0

0

0

0

Missouri

18

18

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Nevada

8

4

0

0

2

0

1

0

0

New Jersey

20

20

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

New Mexico

12

0

7

0

0

3

2

0

0

Ohio

22

0

22

0

0

0

0

0

0

Oklahoma

3

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Penn.

12

0

12

0

0

0

0

0

0

So. Carolina

10

10

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

So, Dakota

3

.5

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

Tennessee

21

9

0

12

0

0

0

0

0

Texas

3

1.5

1.5

0

0

0

0

0

0

Utah

16

9

5

0

0

0

0

1

1

Washington

17

15

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

West Va.

6

0

6

0

0

0

0

0

0

Wyoming

13

6

0

0

0

4

0

3

0

TOTAL

341

184

103.5

19

9

9

6

5

4

Candidates seeking the 2016 Constitution Party presidential nomination were: Darrell Castle of Tennessee, Scott Copeland of Texas, Tom Hoefling of Iowa, J. R. Myers of Alaska, Daniel Cummings of Wyoming, Don Grundmann of California, John Diamond of Pennsylvania, and Jeremy Friedbaum of Utah.

There was one abstention from Nevada and one half-vote abstention from South Dakota.

The 21 states not listed did not send any delegates to the convention: Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

In 2012, these fifteen states did not send any delegates: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Kentucky, Maine, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin.

In 2008, these eleven states had no delegates: Alabama, Connecticut, Hawaii, Indiana, Michigan, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

The party’s national chair, Frank Fluckiger of Utah, was re-elected. He received 40 votes; Randy Stufflebeam, his only opponent, received 28 votes.

The vice-presidential nominee, Scott Bradley of Utah, was nominated without opposition by voice vote. He had been the party’s nominee for U.S. Senate in Utah in 2010, and he had polled 5.7%, in a race against both major parties.


2016 PETITIONING FOR PRESIDENT

The petitioning chart on page four only has room for the Constitution, Green, and Libertarian Parties, but other parties are petitioning as well. The Socialist Workers Party is finished in New Jersey. The Party for Socialism and Liberation is finished in New Mexico. The Legal Marijuana Now Party only needs 800 more signatures in Nebraska.

STATE
REQUIREMENTS
SIGNATURES COLLECTED
THREE TYPES OF DEADLINES
FULL PARTY
CAND
LIB’T
GREEN
CONSTI
Full Party
Pres Party
Pres. Indp.

Ala.

35,413

5,000

0

0

0

Mar. 1

Mar. 1

Aug. 18

Alaska

(reg) 8,399

#3,005

already on

1,030

already on

May 2

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Ariz.

20,119

* #35,514

already on

already on

0

March 3

Sep. 9

Sep. 9

Ark.

10,000

#1,000

already on

already on

already on

Sep 2 ‘15

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Calif.

(es) (reg) 61,000

178,039

already on

already on

355

Jan. 4

July 11

Aug. 12

Colo.

(reg) 1,000

#pay $1,000

already on

already on

already on

Jan. 8

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Conn.

no procedure

#7,500

*500

*1,000

0

– –

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Del.

(reg) *653

*6,526

already on

*608

*323

Aug. 20

Aug. 20

July 15

D.C.

no procedure

(est.) #4,600

can’t start

already on

can’t start

– –

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Florida

be organized

119,316

already on

already on

already on

April 15

Sep. 1

July 15

Georgia

*7,500

*#7,500

already on

*400

*50

July 12

July 12

July 12

Hawaii

707

#4,347

already on

already on

already on

*Feb. 25

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Idaho

13,047

1,000

already on

0

already on

Aug. 30

Aug. 30

Aug. 24

Illinois

no procedure

#25,000

*5,000

*2,600

*100

– –

June 27

June 27

Indiana

no procedure

#26,700

already on

0

0

– –

June 30

June 30

Iowa

no procedure

#1,500

*100

1,200

0

– –

Aug. 19

Aug. 19

Kansas

16,960

5,000

already on

*1,000

0

June 1

June 1

Aug. 1

Ky.

no procedure

#5,000

*in court

0

*in court

– –

Sep. 9

Sep. 9

La.

(reg) 1,000

#pay $500

already on

already on

124

May 21

Aug. 19

Aug. 19

Maine

(reg) 5,000

#4,000

in court

already on

0

Dec 1 2015

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Md.

10,000

(est.) 38,000

already on

already on

0

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Mass.

(est) (reg) 45,000

#10,000

0

already on

0

Feb. 2

Aug. 2

Aug. 2

Mich.

31,519

30,000

already on

already on

already on

July 21

July 21

July 21

Minn.

98,770

#2,000

0

0

0

May 2

Aug. 23

Aug. 23

Miss.

be organized

1,000

already on

already on

already on

Feb. 1

Sep. 9

Sep. 9

Mo.

10,000

10,000

already on

800

already on

*Aug. 1

* Aug. 1

* Aug. 1

Mont.

5,000

#5,000

already on

0

0

Mar. 17

Aug. 17

Aug. 17

Nebr.

5,395

2,500

already on

*500

0

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Nev.

5,431

5,431

already on

600

already on

June 3

June 3

July 8

N. Hamp.

*14,866

#3,000

0

*275

0

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

N.J.

no procedure

#800

0

0

*finished

– –

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

N. M.

2,565

15,388

already on

already on

already on

June 30

June 30

June 30

N.Y.

no procedure

#15,000

can’t start

already on

can’t start

– –

Aug. 23

Aug. 23

No. Car.

89,366

89,366

already on

10,000

0

May 17

May 17

June 9

No. Dak.

7,000

#4,000

already on

0

*0

Apr. 16

Sep. 5

Sep. 5

Ohio

30,560

5,000

in court

already on

0

July 6

July 6

Aug. 10

Okla.

24,745

40,047

*already on

0

0

March 1

July 15

July 15

Oregon

22,046

17,893

already on

already on

already on

Aug. 30

Aug. 30

Aug. 30

Penn.

no procedure

*21,775

*1,000

*300

*0

– –

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

R.I.

16,203

#1,000

0

0

0

Aug. 1

Sep. 9

Sep. 9

So. Car.

10,000

10,000

already on

already on

already on

May 8

May 8

July 15

So. Dak.

6,936

2,775

*7,000

0

*already on

Mar. 29

July 11

Aug. 4

Tenn.

33,816

275

0

in court

in court

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Aug. 18

Texas

47,086

79,939

already on

already on

*0

*May 22

*May 22

May 9

Utah

2,000

#1,000

already on

0

already on

Feb. 15

Aug. 15

Aug. 15

Vermont

be organized

#1,000

already on

0

0

Dec 31 ‘15

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Virginia

no procedure

#5,000

*1,000

*1,250

0

– –

Aug. 26

Aug. 26

Wash.

no procedure

#1,000

can’t start

can’t start

can’t start

– –

July 23

July 23

West Va.

no procedure

#6,705

already on

already on

9,650

– –

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Wisc.

10,000

#2,000

already on

already on

already on

April 1

Aug. 2

Aug. 2

Wyo.

3,302

3,302

already on

*0

already on

June 1

June 1

Aug. 30

TOTAL STATES ON
32*
21
17*

#partisan label is permitted on the ballot (other than "independent").
"CONSTI" = Constitution Party.
The number of signatures for new parties is in court in Tennessee; for independents, in New Mexico.
* = change since March 1, 2016 issue.


PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY CANDIDATES WHO GOT ON BALLOTS IN MARCH & APRIL

DEMOCRATS

CA.

CT.

D.C.

MT.

N.J.

N.Y.

ORE.

S.D.

Hillary Clinton, New York

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Rocky De La Fuente, California

X

X

X

~
~
~
~
~

Henry Hewes, New York

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Keith Judd, Texas

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Bernie Sanders, Vermont

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Michael Steinberg, Florida

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Willie Wilson, Illinois

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

REPUBLICANS

Jeb Bush, Florida

~

X

~

X

~
~

X

~

Ben Carson, Florida

X

X

~
~
~

X

X

~

Ted Cruz, Texas

X

X

~

X

X

X

X

X

Jim Gilmore, Virginia

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

John Kasich, Ohio

X

X

~

X

X

X

X

X

Marco Rubio, Florida

~

X

~

X

~
~

X

~

Donald Trump, New York

X

X

~

X

X

X

X

X

GREENS

Darryl Cherney, California

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

William Kreml, South Carolina

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Kent Mesplay, Texas

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Sedinam Moyowasifa-Curry, Ca.

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Jill Stein, Massachusetts

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

LIBERTARIANS

Marc Allen Feldman, Ohio

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

John David Hale, Kentucky

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Cecil Ince, Missouri

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Gary Johnson, New Mexico

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Steve Kerbel, Colorado

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

John McAfee, Alabama

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Darryl Perry, New Hampshire

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Austin Petersen, Missouri

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Derrick Reid, California

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Jack Robinson, South Carolina

X

~
~
~
~
~
~

Rhett Smith, Texas

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Joy Waymire, California

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

PEACE AND FREEDOM

Lynn Sandra Kahn, Maryland

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Gloria LaRiva, California

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Monica Moorehead, New York

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

AMERICAN INDEPENDENT

Wiley Drake, California

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Arthur Harris, Maryland

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

James Hedges, Pennsylvania

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Tom Hoefling, Michigan

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

J. R. Myers, Alaska

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Robert Ornelas, California

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Alan Spears, California

X

~
~
~
~
~
~
~

Vote totals for major party candidates, as of April 27, from David Leip’s US Election Atlas (includes caucuses)

DEMOCRATS: Clinton 12,332,108; Sanders 9,181,741; uncommitted 121,234; Martin O’Malley 101,578; Rocky De La Fuente 55,288; other 69,739.

REPUBLICANS: Trump 10,120,706; Cruz 6,917,096; Kasich 3,675,479; Rubio 3,491,488; Carson 732,388; Bush 270,469; uncommitted 81,095; Paul 61,463; Christie 55,898; Huckabee 50,100; Fiorina 37,307; other 41,959.


JILL STEIN AWARDED PRIMARY SEASON MATCHING FUNDS

On April 14,the Federal Election Commission certified that Jill Stein is entitled to primary season matching funds. It appears that she is one of only two individuals who will have received such funds in 2016. The only other person was Martin O’Malley, who sought the Democratic Party nomination but dropped out months ago.

Stein’s first check, for $100,000, has already been sent. She will continue to qualify for more funds between now and early August, when the Green Party holds its national convention. She also received matching funds in 2012, but she didn’t receive any until August 28, 2012.


SOCIALIST EQUALITY TICKET

On April 22, the Socialist Equality Party announced that its national ticket this year is Jerry White for President, and Niles Niemuth for Vice-President. The party has run a ticket in every presidential election starting in 1984, except that it didn’t in 2000. The party name prior to 1996 was Workers League. White meets all the qualifications to be president, but Niemuth is under age 35.


ANTI-TRUMP REPUBLICANS HOPE TO RECRUIT GENERAL MATTIS TO RUN AS INDEPENDENT CANDIDATE

A group of Republicans who are opposed to Donald Trump are trying to persuade Retired General James Norman Mattis to run for President as an independent candidate. Mattis is age 65. He was commander of U.S. Joint Forces between 2007 and 2010, and also NATO Supreme Allied Commander. He lives in Norfolk, Virginia, and is considered a scholar. He retired in May 2013 after 44 years of service. So far Mattis has only told the press that he has not even thought about running for President.


LIBERTARIAN WINS NON-PARTISAN OFFICE IN SOUTH DAKOTA

On April 12, Tricia Weathers, a registered Libertarian, was elected to the Box Elder, South Dakota city council. This is thought to be the first time any member of a party, other than the Republican and Democratic Parties, has won elective office in South Dakota in 80 years. The election is non-partisan.


CONGRESSIONAL CANDIDATE QUALFIES IN TWO STATES

Allen Levene, who lives in Georgia, has qualified for the Republican primary ballots for Congress in two states. He is running in the Georgia 14th district and the Tennessee 3rd district.


AMERICAN INDEPENDENT PARTY GETS MUCH PUBLICITY

The American Independent Party has been on the California ballot since 1968, and ever since the 1980’s, it has had several hundred thousand registrants. The press in California has barely mentioned the party for 30 years. But on April 17, the Los Angeles Times ran a long story about the party. The story reveals that a survey was done with members of the party, and the vast majority of them were unaware they were a member of that party.


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