South Carolina Ballot Access Lawsuit Hearing September 11

The Working Families Party’s ballot access case will be heard in federal court on September 11 at 2 p.m. The issue is whether the party (which the state admits is a qualified party) is permitted to nominate candidates this year. The party followed the law, which permits a party to submit its petition no later than six months before the general election. But the state says if a new party wants to nominate any candidates in its first year on the ballot, it must really submit the petition much earlier.

The state lost on this issue in 1996, in a lawsuit won by the Natural Law Party. In 1996, the state admitted it was wrong, and didn’t contest the lawsuit. This year the state says should never have given in, back in 1996. The hearing is before Judge Cameron McGowan, a Clinton appointee.

New Hampshire Will Rotate Party Columns

New Hampshire previously put the Republican Party column first on the general election ballot; then the Democratic column; then any others. The New Hampshire Supreme Court declared that system unconstitutional back on August 17.

On September 9, after a meeting with all interested parties, New Hampshire’s Secretary of State said that in November 2006, that Democrats will appear first in one-third of the state’s State Senate districts; Republicans will appear first in another third of those districts; and Libertarians and independents will appear first in the remaining third. After 2006, the system will be based on whatever the legislature decides, subject to the principle of the court decision, mandating equal opportunity for all to get the best spot on the ballot.

Colorado Green Party Won't Appear in Any Statewide Race

The Colorado Green Party, a ballot-qualified party, nominated only one statewide candidate this year, for Secretary of State. He recently withdrew from the race. He said he didn’t want to injure the chances of the Democratic nominee for that office, since the Democrats favors Instant-Runoff Voting and the Republican nominee for that office is opposed to it.

The Colorado Green Party’s ballot status will not be threatened, just because it has no statewide nominees this year. The party has 4,789 registered voters. A party may remain ballot-qualified in Colorado if it has 1,000 registered voters.

Colorado parties that are still on the ballot for a statewide race are the Libertarian and Constitution Parties.

Colorado Green Party Won’t Appear in Any Statewide Race

The Colorado Green Party, a ballot-qualified party, nominated only one statewide candidate this year, for Secretary of State. He recently withdrew from the race. He said he didn’t want to injure the chances of the Democratic nominee for that office, since the Democrats favors Instant-Runoff Voting and the Republican nominee for that office is opposed to it.

The Colorado Green Party’s ballot status will not be threatened, just because it has no statewide nominees this year. The party has 4,789 registered voters. A party may remain ballot-qualified in Colorado if it has 1,000 registered voters.

Colorado parties that are still on the ballot for a statewide race are the Libertarian and Constitution Parties.