November 2013 Ballot Access News Print Edition

Ballot Access News
November 1, 2013 – Volume 29, Number 6

This issue was printed on cream paper.


Table of Contents

  1. OHIO LEGISLATURE STRUGGLES WITH BALLOT ACCESS BILL
  2. ARIZONA BALLOT ACCESS BARRIER WON’T BE APPLIED IN 2014
  3. OHIO SUPREME COURT EASES INDEPENDENT CANDIDATE ACCESS
  4. LEGISLATIVE NEWS
  5. ALABAMA BALLOT ACCESS LAWSUITS
  6. OTHER BALLOT ACCESS LAWSUITS
  7. OTHER LAWSUIT NEWS
  8. CONGRESSIONAL VOTE ON RE-OPENING THE GOVERNMENT
  9. BOOK REVIEW: THE PARTY IS OVER
  10. FILM REVIEW: 100 SIGNATURES
  11. DATES OF U.S. HOUSE PRIMARIES
  12. MINNESOTA MAN LEAVES $50,000 BEQUEST TO GREEN PARTY
  13. TV JOURNALIST ED RABEL JOINS GREENS
  14. MARIANNE WILLIAMSON WILL RUN FOR CONGRESS AS INDEPENDENT
  15. LOUISIANA U.S. HOUSE RETURNS
  16. FOUNDER OF MODERATE PARTY BECOMES A REPUBLICAN
  17. FEC 2012 ELECTION RETURNS BOOK
  18. SUBSCRIBING TO BAN WITH PAYPAL

OHIO LEGISLATURE STRUGGLES WITH BALLOT ACCESS BILL

On October 8, the Ohio Senate passed SB 193, a bill that removes the Constitution, Green, Libertarian, and Socialist Parties from the ballot in 2014.

On October 30, the House passed the bill, but only after amending it to make it less harmful. But the Senate refused to concur in the House amendments. The bill now goes to a conference committee.

The existing Ohio law requires a petition signed by 1% of the last vote cast for a party to get on the ballot, and a vote of 5% for the office at the top of the ticket for a party to remain on the ballot. Currently the 1% petition amounts to 55,806 signatures.

However, the existing law was declared unconstitutional in 2006, so ever since Ohio has been letting any party be on the ballot with no petition, if it demonstrates that it has a modicum of voter support. Parties that gained a place on the ballot that way are Americans Elect, Constitution, Green, Libertarian, and Socialist. Americans Elect no longer exists but the other four parties were expecting to be on the 2014 ballot, just as they have been on the ballot for all elections 2008 through 2013. But SB 193 replaces the old unconstitutional law struck down in 2006, and if it passes, the state will then remove all minor parties and force them to re-petition for 2014.

The old law was struck down because the petition deadline was too early. SB 193 fixes that by providing that newly-qualifying parties would not participate in the primary, which is in May in midterm years and March in presidential years. Instead a new party would submit a petition by early July, and then any candidate for that party would qualify by his or her own small petition. The bill does not explain how to handle an instance in which two members of that party both petition for the same office.

The Senate version of the bill keeps the 1% petition intact, but the House version lowers it to one-half of 1%. The Senate version improves the vote test for a party to remain on the ballot, from 5% at the last election, to 3% at either of the last two elections. The House version makes it 2%. Only the vote for President and Governor counts, under both versions of the bill.

The Senate is dominated by Republicans who appear eager to remove the Libertarian Party from the 2014 ballot, because the party’s gubernatorial nominee, Charlie Earl, is a former state legislator who is expected to run a strong campaign. The House Republicans are less hostile to the Libertarian Party, which is why the House version of the bill is gentler.


ARIZONA BALLOT ACCESS BARRIER WON’T BE APPLIED IN 2014

Earlier this year, the Arizona legislature passed HB 2305, which would keep virtually all minor party nominees off the ballot in future elections. But, thanks to a referendum petition drive which has succeeded, the new restriction can’t be used in 2014, and perhaps will never be used.

HB 2305 is an omnibus bill, with many provisions (unrelated to ballot access) that the Democratic Party opposes, especially a provision making it illegal for party workers to deliver voted absentee ballots to the elections office. So, the Democratic Party organized a referendum petition. When referendum petitions get enough signatures, the referred law can’t take effect until the voters decide whether to repeal it or not. On October 23, the Secretary of State determined that the petition, which needed 86,405 valid signatures, is sufficient. Therefore, voters in November 2014 will decide whether to repeal the law.

The old law says candidates need signatures to get on their own party’s primary ballot, signed by one-half of 1% of that party’s members. Libertarians generally need about 125 signatures of party members for statewide office, and Greens generally need about 30 signatures of party members. If HB 2305 ever takes effect, members of those parties would need approximately 5,500 signatures of party members. Independent voters are also permitted to sign such petitions, but Democrats and Republicans can’t sign.

Defenders of HB 2305 say the law treats all candidates equally, because it applies the 5,500 signature standard to all candidates for statewide office, no matter their party. But what defenders of the bill don’t say is that it would be far easier for Republicans and Democrats to get the signatures because their parties each have approximately 1,000,000 registered members, so it is far easier to find eligible signers.

HB 2305 also increases the number of write-ins needed to nominate a candidate in a small party’s primary, so that, realistically, no one could ever again be nominated by write-in in a small party’s primary.

The only states in which the voters have voted specifically on ballot access for minor party and independent candidates are Florida (in 1998) and Massachusetts (in 1990). In both states, voters voted in favor of easier ballot access for minor parties and independent candidates.

If the voters uphold the bill, the ballot access parts might still be held unconstitutional. A similar law was struck down in Pennsylvania. The legislature had passed a bill, requiring 2,000 signatures of party members for a statewide candidate to get on the ballot, but the Consumer Party only had 7,000 members, and won a lawsuit against the new law.


OHIO SUPREME COURT EASES INDEPENDENT CANDIDATE ACCESS

Recently, the Ohio Supreme Court issued two decisions which greatly ease the ability for people to qualify as independent candidates. Ohio law says an independent candidate is someone who submits enough valid signatures, and who "does not consider himself affiliated with a political party." The latter restriction was passed in 1981, because the Ohio legislature was upset that someone who had run for party office in the 1980 Republican primary, and lost, had then qualified as an independent candidate for the legislature.

Starting in 2006, both federal and state courts in Ohio have been interpreting the law to mean that no one can be an independent candidate if he or she has too many connections with a political party. Ohio voter registration forms do not ask voters to choose a party or independent status, so there is no objective standard in Ohio to determine who is an independent voter. So courts started keeping people off the ballot based on how they behave, what meetings they attend, who they give campaign donations to, and what they say in public about themselves.

But on October 11, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled that Demaine Kitchen can be an independent candidate for Mayor of Youngstown this year, even though in the past, he had served on the executive committee of the county Democratic Party, and in 2009 he had voted in the Democratic primary, and he is an assistant to the outgoing Mayor, who is a Democrat. That decision is State ex rel Monroe v Mahoning County Board of Elections, 2013-4490.

And on October 18, the Ohio Supreme Court ruled that Darrita Davis can be an independent candidate for Akron City Council this year, even though in April 2013 she bought a ticket to a Democratic Party event for $25, and in June 2013 she bought another ticket to another party event for $20. Also she had voted in the March 2012 Democratic primary.

In response to these two decisions, on October 16, two state legislators introduced HB 305, which would provide that future voter registration forms should ask people to choose a party, or to choose independent status. So far the bill has not made any headway. If the legislature does nothing, the vagueness of the existing law will continue to create uncertainty. The two Ohio Supreme Court decisions don’t set forth any bright line rules to settle future disputes over who is an independent and who isn’t.


LEGISLATIVE NEWS

California: on October 3, Governor Jerry Brown signed AB 1419, the bill that moves the deadline for newly-qualifying parties, in presidential years, from January to July.

California (2): on October 13, the Governor vetoed AB 857, which would have invalidated statewide initiative petitions unless at least 10% of the valid signatures had been collected by unpaid volunteers.

New Hampshire: Representative Joel Winters (D-Manchester) has introduced HB 2523, to lower the vote test for a group to gain or keep "party" status, from 4%, to 3%. The legislature isn’t in session now but will reconvene in January. New Hampshire legislators are free to introduce bills while the legislature is not in session. The New Hampshire vote test was 3% between 1891 and 1997, but was increased to 4% in 1997. Ever since, New Hampshire has not had any ballot-qualified parties on the ballot other than the two major parties. The only other states that haven’t had any ballot-qualified parties (other than Democratic and Republican) since 1997 are New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

South Carolina: Senator Lee Bright (R-Roebuck) and Representative Bill Chumley (R-Woodruff) will introduce a bill in 2014 to let parties close their primaries. The bill would change voter registration forms to ask voters to choose a party, or choose independent status. Similar bills have failed to pass in past years.


ALABAMA BALLOT ACCESS LAWSUITS

Two ballot access lawsuits in Alabama are very active. One concerns minor parties, and one deals with independent candidates.

Minor party lawsuit: the October 1 B.A.N. reported that on September 5, U.S. District Court Judge W. Keith Watkins had upheld the March petition deadline. The case, Stein v Bennett, had been filed by the Constitution, Green, and Libertarian Parties. On October 3, the parties asked for reconsideration. On October 24, the Judge asked the state to respond to the reconsideration request. This is a good sign, because most requests for reconsideration are simply denied outright. The state’s response is due October 31.

Meanwhile, the state filed a request with the court that the minor parties be required to pay the court costs, which amount to $7,100. The costs are so high because the state took very lengthy depositions from most of the individual plaintiffs, including Gary Johnson and Jill Stein.

Independent candidate lawsuit: The case over whether independent candidate James Hall may be on the December 17 special election, for U.S. House, District One, is being expedited, and will probably have a decision by November 8. The issue is whether the state must reduce the number of signatures, or expand the deadline, when the normal petitioning time is shorter than usual.

Normally independent candidates in Alabama can take years to complete their petition, but in this case, the special election was not expected, so the petitioning time was less than three months. The state demands 5,938 valid signatures by mid-September. The candidate submitted 2,835 signatures by that deadline, and has collected several hundred more since then. If he does not get on the ballot, only the Democratic and Republican nominees will be on, because no other independent or minor party submitted any petition. The case is Hall v Bennett.


OTHER BALLOT ACCESS LAWSUITS

Michigan: on September 30, the Libertarian Party asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear Libertarian Party of Michigan v Johnson, 13-421. The issue is whether the state was correct when it barred Gary Johnson, Libertarian presidential nominee, from the general election ballot, on the grounds that his name had appeared on the February 2012 Republican presidential primary. Soon, an amicus curiae brief will be filed by six political science professors and former Congressman John B. Anderson, who was an independent candidate for President in 1980 and who got on the Michigan November ballot even though he had run in the Michigan presidential primary.

North Carolina: on October 29, the Fourth Circuit heard arguments in Pisano v Strach, over the May petition deadline for new parties. It is difficult to predict the decision, which should be out in a few months.

Tennessee: on October 10, the Constitution and Green Parties filed a new ballot access lawsuit. The issues are (1) the law that requires newly-qualifying parties to swear they don’t advocate the overthrow of the government; (2) whether the order that put them on the ballot last year should extend to the 2014 election as well. Green Party of Tennessee v Hargett, 3:13cv-1128. This case should not be confused with the case filed last year which has the same name; that case is on appeal to the Sixth Circuit and concerns the order of candidates on the ballot, and whether the petition requirement of 2.5% is unconstitutional.

Tennessee (2): on October 9, the Libertarian Party filed a lawsuit in federal court, seeking to be put on the ballot for a special legislative election in Memphis in December. The existing law on how a party gets on the ballot was struck down earlier this year, but the Libertarian Party was not part of that lawsuit. The case has a hearing on October 31. Tomasik v Goins, middle district, 3:13cv-1118.


OTHER LAWSUIT NEWS

Arizona: on October 15, the State Court of Appeals issued an order, imposing the old, low contribution limits for candidates for state office for 2014. The legislature this year increased the limits from $440 to $4,000, but now the new limits are not in effect. The basis is that the bill raising the limits did not pass with a three-fourths majority in the legislature, and laws that change the campaign finance system need 75%. Arizona Clean Elections Commission v Brain, 1CA-SA-13-239.

Arizona (2): on September 30, a U.S. District Court struck down a state law that requires anyone who spends $500 to support or oppose a ballot measure to file as a Political Committee and make regular campaign finance reports. Galassini v Town of Fountain Hills, cv-11-2097.

Arkansas: on October 18, the ACLU filed a lawsuit in state court against restrictions placed on the initiative process. The new law requires that paid circulators must submit their name and address to the Secretary of State before starting to work, must include a picture taken within the last 90 days, and sign an oath that they have not been convicted of certain crimes. None of these restrictions are imposed on volunteer circulators. The case is Spencer v Sealy, Pulaski Circuit Court, 60cv-13-4020.

Colorado: on October 21, the State Supreme Court struck down a state law that says a voter who fails to vote (in a recall election) on whether the officer should be recalled, cannot then vote on the other part of the ballot that chooses a new office-holder. The decision has good language about the freedom of voters to vote as they please. In re Interrogatory Propounded by Governor Hickenlooper, 13-SA-214.

Florida: on November 4, the U.S. Supreme Court may reveal whether it will hear Worley v Detzner, 13-333. The case was filed by four individuals who each wanted to spend $150 on some radio ads against an initiative.

Since, together, they were spending more than $500, state law required them to form a political committee and make regular campaign finance reports. The lower court upheld the law.

Mississippi: on September 30, a U.S. District Court struck down a state law that says individuals who spend as little as $200 to influence an election must register and file monthly campaign finance reports. The individuals who filed the lawsuit had spent somewhat more than $200 to distribute flyers, put up posters, and by an ad in their local newspaper in support of a statewide ballot measure on eminent domain. Justice v Hosemann, U.S. District Court, n.d., 3:11cv-138.

Nevada: on October 7 the Republican Party asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear Republican Party of Nevada v Miller, 13-442. The case originally concerned the Nevada law that puts "none of these candidates" on the ballot for statewide office in both the primary and general election. The party’s original complaint said that voters who voted for "none of these candidates" are being discriminated against because if their choice wins, nothing happens. The Ninth Circuit then ruled that none of the plaintiffs, including voters who said they wanted to vote for "None of these candidates" have standing, so the appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court is about standing.

The Libertarian, Green, Constitution, Independent American, and America’s Parties, filed an amicus curiae brief urging the Court to hear the case and expand standing for political parties, candidates, and voters.

New York: on October 25, the U.S. Court of Appeals, 2nd circuit, enjoined a state law that makes it illegal for anyone to contribute more than $150,000 to a committee that is making independent expenditures for or against a candidate. The plaintiff wanted to contribute $200,000 to a group that runs ads in favor of the Republican nominee for Mayor of New York city, Joseph Lhota. New York Progress and Protection PAC v Walsh, 13-3889.

New Jersey: on October 25, a lower state court upheld the ballot format used in most New Jersey counties, which discriminates against candidates who are not Democratic or Republican nominees. New Jersey is the only state that never gives party columns to any parties other than the two major parties. Most counties put all other candidates into party columns that are headed "Nomination by Petition". That column is always on the far right-hand side of the ballot, and many voters probably don’t even notice it. The plaintiff, an independent candidate, is appealing. Stein v McGettigan, Atlantic County Superior Court, L4907-13.

Pennsylvania: on October 4, the Commonwealth Court refused to put an independent candidate for Mayor of Harrisburg back on the ballot. He had been removed because he didn’t choose a "substitution committee." A "substitution committee" is a group of people empowered to replace the original independent candidate with someone else, if the original candidate dies or withdraws. The candidate, Nevin Mindlin, said if he died or withdrew, he wouldn’t want to have someone else take his place on the ballot.


CONGRESSIONAL VOTE ON RE-OPENING THE GOVERNMENT

On October 16, both Houses of Congress voted on HR 2775, the bill that allowed the federal government shutdown to end. The bill passed, with all Democrats and a substantial minority of Republicans voting for it. The results rebut the conclusion that Republicans from closed primary states are less moderate than Republicans from open primary states, if one assumes that a vote for the bill is a "moderate" vote.

A total of 276 Republican members of both houses of Congress voted on the bill. Among those, 135 were from states with open Republican primaries, 39 from states with semi-closed Republican primaries, 24 from states with top-two primaries, and 78 from states with closed Republican primaries.

Of the four primary types, semi-closed primaries are most likely to produce Republicans who voted to re-open the government. Shown below are the four types of primary, and the percentage of Republicans who voted for HR 2775 from each category:

  • Semi-closed: 59.0%
  • Top-two: 54.2%
  • Closed: 44.9%
  • Open: 31.9%

A semi-closed primary is one in which only party members and independent voters may vote in the primary. A top-two primary is one in which parties do not have nominees, all candidates run on a single primary ballot, and only the top two can run in November. A closed primary is one in which only party members can vote. An open primary is one in which parties have their own primary ballots, but on primary day any voter is free to choose any primary ballot.


BOOK REVIEW: THE PARTY IS OVER

The Party is Over: How Republicans Went Crazy, Democrats Became Useless, and the Middle Class got Shafted, by Mike Lofgren, 2012.

Mike Lofgren spent 28 years as an analyst for Congressional committees, including both Budget Committees. He is a Republican who is dismayed with his own party’s members of Congress. There are many books about the dysfunction of Congress these past few years, but this book is unique because the author knows the workings of Congress so well. Although the book is very critical of congressional Republicans, it is not complementary to Democrats either.

The book was on best-seller lists during 2012, and has an audio version. It was recently re-issued in paperback. For more about the book, see the web page mikelofgren.net.

This book, and similar books, all add to the heightened interest on the part of voters in alternatives beyond the Republican and Democratic Parties. A poll released by NBC and the Wall Street Journal on October 29 shows that 30% of the voters say they would like to vote for candidates who are neither Democrats nor Republicans, and that a majority of voters now self-describe themselves as not affiliated with either major party.


FILM REVIEW: 100 SIGNATURES

100 Signatures, a documentary film by Dean & Nicole Greco, 90 minutes.

100 Signatures is being premiered on November 3 in Flemington, New Jersey, and afterwards will be entered into several film festivals. If the film gets a good reception at the film festivals, it will then be in movie theaters. It has already been accepted by the Downbeach Film Festival in Atlantic City. Dean Greco ran as an independent candidate for Congress in New Jersey in 2008, with the ballot label, "All-Day Breakfast Party." He received 3,259 votes, which was not bad given that the district in which he ran, the 7th, was considered one of the closest races in the nation.

Greco has extensive training in both film-making and comedy, and his wife is an experienced TV news producer. Together, they have created a funny and engaging film about what it is like to be an independent candidate for Congress. We see Greco petitioning, attempting to raise campaign funds, campaigning by going door-to-door, and also we see him interviewing elected officials and political commentators who have written about the election process. The film covers U.S. ballot access laws. The title of reflects the fact that in New Jersey, independents for U.S. House only need 100 signatures.


DATES OF U.S. HOUSE PRIMARIES

This chart shows the dates of congressional primaries for each state, for all midterm years 1990-2014. The median date shows that congressional primaries are getting earlier in the year. The range shows the huge variation between the dates of the earliest primaries (March) and the latest (September).

State
2014
2010
2006
2002
1998
1994
1990

Alabama

June 3

June 1

June 6

June 4

June 2

June 7

June 5

Alaska

August 26

August 24

August 22

August 27

August 25

August 23

August 28

Arizona

August 26

August 24

Sept. 12

Sept. 10

Sept. 8

Sept. 13

Sept. 11

Arkansas

May 20

May 18

May 23

May 21

May 19

May 24

May 29

California

June 3

June 8

.June 6

March 5

June 2

June 7

June 5

Colorado

June 24

August 10

August 8

August 13

August 11

August 9

August 14

Connecticut

August 12

August 10

August 8

Sept. 10

Sept. 15

Sept. 13

Sept. 11

Delaware

Sept. 9

Sept. 14

Sept. 12

Sept. 7

Sept. 12

Sept. 10

Sept. 8

Florida

August 12

August 24

Sept. 5

Sept. 10

Sept. 1

Sept. 8

Sept. 4

Georgia

July 15

July 20

July 18

August 20

July 21

July 19

July 17

Hawaii

August 9

Sept. 18

Sept. 23

Sept. 21

Sept. 19

Sept. 17

Sept. 22

Idaho

May 20

May 25

May 23

May 28

May 26

May 24

May 22

Illinois

March 18

February 2

March 21

March 19

March 17

March 15

March 20

Indiana

May 6

May 4

May 2

May 7

May 5

May 3

May 8

Iowa

June 3

June 8

June 6

June 4

June 2

June 7

June 5

Kansas

August 5

August 3

August 1

August 6

August 4

August 2

August 7

Kentucky

May 20

May 18

May 16

May 28

May 26

May 24

May 29

Louisiana

no primary

August 28

no primary

no primary

no primary

Oct. 1

Oct. 6

Maine

June 10

June 8

June 13

June 11

June 9

June 14

June 12

Maryland

June 24

Sept. 14

Sept. 12

Sept. 10

Sept. 15

Sept. 13

Sept. 11

Mass.

Sept. 16

Sept. 14

Sept. 19

Sept. 17

Sept. 15

Sept. 20

Sept. 18

Michigan

August 5

August 3

August 8

August 6

August 4

August 2

August 7

Minnesota

August 12

August 10

Sept. 12

Sept. 10

Sept. 15

Sept. 13

Sept. 11

Mississippi

June 3

June 1

June 6

June 4

June 2

June 7

June 5

Missouri

August 5

August 3

August 8

August 6

August 4

August 2

August 7

Montana

June 3

June 8

June 6

June 4

June 2

June 7

June 5

Nebraska

May 13

May 11

May 9

May 14

May 12

May 10

May 15

Nevada

June 10

June 8

August 15

Sept. 3

Sept. 1

Sept. 6

Sept. 4

New Hamp.

Sept. 9

Sept. 14

Sept. 12

Sept. 10

Sept. 8

Sept. 13

Sept. 11

New Jersey

June 3

June 8

June 6

June 4

June 2

June 7

June 5

New Mex.

June 3

June 1

June 6

June 4

June 2

June 7

June 5

New York

June 24

Sept. 14

Sept. 12

Sept. 10

Sept. 15

Sept. 13

Sept. 11

No. Car.

May 6

May 4

May 2

Sept. 10

Sept. 15

May 3

May 8

No. Dakota

June 10

June 8

June 13

June 11

June 9

June 14

June 12

Ohio

May 6

May 4

May 2

May 7

May 5

May 3

May 8

Oklahoma

June 24

July 27

July 25

August 27

August 25

August 23

August 28

Oregon

May 20

May 18

May 16

May 21

May 19

May 17

May 15

Pennsyl.

May 20

May 18

May 16

May 21

May 19

May 10

May 15

Rhode Is.

Sept. 9

Sept. 14

Sept. 12

Sept. 10

Sept. 15

Sept. 13

Sept. 11

So. Caro.

June 10

June 8

June 13

June 11

June 9

August 9

June 12

So. Dakota

June 3

June 8

June 6

June 4

June 2

June 7

June 5

Tennessee

August 7

August 5

August 3

August 1

August 6

August 4

August 2

Texas

March 4

March 2

March 7

March 12

March 10

March 8

March 13

Utah

June 24

June 22

June 27

June 25

June 23

June 28

Sept. 11

Vermont

August 26

August 24

Sept. 12

Sept. 10

Sept. 8

Sept. 13

Sept. 11

Virginia

June 10

June 8

June 13

June 11

June 9

June 14

June 12

Washington

August 5

August 17

Sept. 19

Sept. 17

Sept. 15

Sept. 20

Sept. 18

West Va.

May 13

May 11

May 9

May 14

May 12

May 10

May 8

Wisconsin

August 12

Sept. 14

Sept. 12

Sept. 10

Sept. 8

Sept. 13

Sept. 11

Wyoming

August 19

August 17

August 22

August 20

August 18

August 16

August 21

MEDIAN

June 10

June 15

June 13

August 1

July 21

July 26

July 25

RANGE

196 days

228 days

200 days

200 days

193 days

207 days

207 days


MINNESOTA MAN LEAVES $50,000 BEQUEST TO GREEN PARTY

A few weeks ago, the Green Party national office was surprised to receive a check for $50,000 in the mail. Last year a Minnesota man, who had not even been known to the party, died. When his estate was processed, it was learned that he had left $50,000 to the party. Unfortunately, Federal Election Commission regulations don’t permit any party to receive that much money in any two-year period from anyone. So the party had to return the check to the attorney for the estate, and ask that the amount be broken up into two checks, one that can be paid now, and one that can be paid in 2015. The Libertarian Party has a lawsuit pending in the U.S. Court of Appeals, D.C. Circuit, against the FEC rule on bequests to political parties. If the party wins the case, presumably that would make it possible for the Green Party to receive the entire amount sooner.


TV JOURNALIST ED RABEL JOINS GREENS

On October 11, Ed Rabel announced that he had switched his voter registration to the Green Party (although in West Virginia, where he lives, the party’s name is the Mountain Party). He also said he may seek the party’s nomination for U.S. House next year, in the 2nd district, which is an open seat because the incumbent, Shelley Moore Capito, a Republican, is not running for re-election.

Rabel worked for CBS 1965-1985, and for NBC 1985-1998. His autobiography, "Lies, Wars, and Other Misadventures" was published last year. He spent decades as a foreign correspondent, including many years in Vietnam and also Israel. He has visited Cuba more than 100 times. He was NBC’s correspondent for the Pentagon 1993-1997.


MARIANNE WILLIAMSON WILL RUN FOR CONGRESS AS INDEPENDENT

Marianne Williamson, a very well-known author, will run for U.S. House, 33rd California district, as an independent, next year. The incumbent is Democrat Henry Waxman.


LOUISIANA U.S. HOUSE RETURNS

Louisiana held a special election to fill the vacant U.S. House seat, 5th district, on October 19. Fourteen candidates appeared on the ballot: five Republicans, four Democrats, two Libertarians, two independents, and one Green. No one got a majority, so there is a run-off on November 16 between two Republicans, Neil Riser and Vance McAllister.

The five Republicans received, together, 70,284 votes; the four Democrats received 30,931; the two Libertarians received 1,015; the two independents received 659; the Green received 492. The two Libertarians were Henry Herford and S. B. A. Zaitoon; the Green was Eliot Barron.


FOUNDER OF MODERATE PARTY BECOMES A REPUBLICAN

On October 28, Ken Block, founder of the ballot-qualified Moderate Party of Rhode Island, announced that he had become a Republican and that he will seek the Republican nomination for Governor in 2014. Although the Moderate Party will continue to be a qualified party in 2014, it is very unlikely that it will survive beyond that year, because it must poll 5% for Governor to extend its status.

Block had worked tirelessly and effectively this year to repeal Rhode Island’s straight-ticket device, but even though a majority of the state legislature agreed to support a repeal bill, the bill did not pass because the Speaker of the House opposed it. The straight-ticket device is very harmful to third parties and independent candidates, especially for candidates for less important partisan office.


FEC 2012 ELECTION RETURNS BOOK

The Federal Election Commission book "Federal Elections 2012" is now in print. It has primary and general election returns for all federal office, and is 183 pages. Anyone may receive a free copy by phoning the FEC at 800-424-9530. The employees who prepare this book do an excellent job.


SUBSCRIBING TO BAN WITH PAYPAL

If you use Paypal, you can subscribe to B.A.N., or renew, with Paypal. If you use a credit card in connection with Paypal, use richardwinger@yahoo.com. If you don’t use a credit card in conjunction with Paypal, use sub@richardwinger.com.

Ballot Access News is published by and copyright by Richard Winger. Note: subscriptions are available!


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Comments

November 2013 Ballot Access News Print Edition — 1 Comment

  1. In New York State, there may be two primaries, one federal in June and state offices in September; or else there may be a single June primary in 2014 and beyond. Ironically, ballot access for constituted third parties in NY State may be collateral damage of the legislature’s delay in deciding on the primary dates since unless these parties hold their state party Conventions timely they will lose ballot status without having a governor candidate on the ballot.

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