March 2016 Ballot Access News Print Edition

Ballot Access News
March 1, 2016 – Volume 31, Number 10

 

This issue was printed on green paper.

 


Table of Contents
 

  1. SOUTH DAKOTA IMPROVES NEW PARTY DEADLINE
  2. KENTUCKY DEBATE PROCEDURAL WIN
  3. UTAH LEGISLATURE REPEALS STRAIGHT-TICKET DEVICE
  4. ILLINOIS BALLOT ACCESS WIN
  5. INDEPENDENT PARTY SUES CALIFORNIA
  6. MISSOURI BALLOT ACCESS WIN
  7. MISSISSIPPI BALLOT ACCESS WIN
  8. ARKANSAS DEFEAT
  9. BALLOT ACCESS BILLS
  10. FEBRUARY 2016 REGISTRATION TOTALS
  11. 2016 PETITIONING FOR PRESIDENT
  12. PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY CANDIDATES WHO GOT ON BALLOTS IN FEBRUARY
  13. REPUBLICAN PARTY DONORS ASK CONSULTING FIRM TO ANALYZE BALLOT ACCESS LAWS FOR INDEPENDENT RUN
  14. SOCIALIST WORKERS PARTY TICKET
  15. NEW PARTY QUALIFIES IN HAWAII
  16. ILLINOIS GREEN PARTY PRIVATE PRIMARY RESULTS
  17. CALIFORNIA SECRETARY OF STATE WON’T PUT JILL STEIN ON PEACE & FREEDOM PARTY PRIMARY
  18. BERNIE SANDERS CRITICIZES BALLOT ACCESS RESTRICTIONS
  19. JIM WEBB WON’T RUN FOR PRESIDENT
  20. FEC 2014 ELECTION RETURNS BOOK
  21. SUBSCRIBING TO BAN WITH PAYPAL

SOUTH DAKOTA IMPROVES NEW PARTY DEADLINE
IMPROVEMENT ONLY HELPS FOR CERTAIN OFFICES

On February 26, the South Dakota Attorney General issued a ruling that changes the deadline for new parties to submit a petition for party status. The old deadline was March 29; the new deadline is July 11.

However, parties that qualify using the later deadline may only nominate candidates for President, and for the statewide executive offices other than Governor. They can’t run for Congress, Governor, or state legislature.

This ruling was issued because the Libertarian and Constitution Parties have been suing the state over the March 29 petition deadline for full party status. That petition requires 6,936 signatures. The parties had submitted much evidence showing how difficult that petition is, because either the signatures must be collected in the odd year before the election year, or else they must be collected in winter weather. The lawsuit is Libertarian Party of South Dakota v Krebs, 4:15cv-4111.

To defend itself from that lawsuit, the state re-interpreted its election law. State law says qualified parties nominate by convention for presidential elector, and for all the statewide executive offices except Governor. The ruling reasons that because state party conventions for those offices aren’t held until August, there is no reason to have the petition deadline earlier than mid-July.


KENTUCKY DEBATE PROCEDURAL WIN

On February 5, U.S. District Court Judge Gregory Van Tatenhove, a George W. Bush appointee, issued an order in Libertarian National Committee and Kentucky Libertarian Party v Holiday, e.d., 14-63.

The issue is whether Kentucky Educational TV excluded the Libertarian Party nominee for U.S. Senate in Kentucky, David Patterson, because of prejudice against him and his view. The debate sponsor had tried to get the lawsuit dismissed, but the judge kept it alive and said the party can take depositions from the broadcasters, to see if they deliberately changed the rules for getting into the debate in order to exclude him. The station changed the polling requirement from 5% to 10% after a poll showed Patterson above 5%.


UTAH LEGISLATURE REPEALS STRAIGHT-TICKET DEVICE

On February 24, the Utah legislature passed SB 25, which repeals the straight-ticket device. The straight-ticket device lets voters vote for all the nominees of one party with a single mark at the top of the ballot. Voters who use it don’t need to look at the rest of the ballot, for partisan offices. But many votes who use the device then fail to vote on ballot measures and non-partisan races.

The vote was unanimous in both houses of the legislature, so it seems extremely likely that Governor Gary Herbert will sign it.

A straight-ticket device is very harmful to independent candidates, and it also hurts minor parties. In 2010, when Wisconsin still had the device, Green Party nominee Ben Manski polled 31.1% of the vote for Assembly, 77th district, in a race against both major parties. An analysis of the election returns showed Manski won the election among the voters who did not use the device. But when straight-ticket voters weighed in, he lost. Eight other states still have the device.


ILLINOIS BALLOT ACCESS WIN

On February 12, U.S. District Court Judge Andrea Wood, an Obama appointee, struck down the Illinois law that says newly-qualifying parties must run a full slate of candidates. This means if the party circulates a statewide petition, it must have a nominee for every statewide office. If it circulates a petition for county executive office, it must run for each of those offices. The law has no impact on U.S. House or state legislative petitions. Libertarian Party of Illinois v Board of Elections, n.d., 1:12cv-2511.

When the law was passed in 1931, Illinois state house districts elected three members with cumulative voting. That means a party was free to run either one, two, or three candidates. Voters could vote for three candidates, or they could give one candidate two votes and a second candidate one vote, or they could give all three of their votes to just one candidate. This made it easier for parties that weren’t in the majority to elect at least one representative. For example, the Republican Party might just run one candidate in a strongly Democratic district.

That would be a signal to the Republican voters in that district to give all three of their votes to that one Republican, giving him or her a good chance to win.

But the full-slate law spoiled that strategy for newly-qualifying parties; they were forced to run three candidates, thus diluting their votes. The law was passed because of fear that Claude Lightfoot, a very popular Communist Party activist in Chicago, might get elected to the legislature. He only polled 33,337 votes for State House.


INDEPENDENT PARTY SUES CALIFORNIA

On February 16, the Independent Party filed a federal lawsuit against the California Secretary of State, over his refusal to let the Independent Party qualify as a political body. Independent Party v Padilla, e.d., 2:16cv-316. A “political body” is a group that desires to qualify as a party, and groups file for political body status to obtain a tally of how many registered voters they have. The Secretary refuses their request because he says the name “Independent Party” is too similar to the name of the already qualified American Independent Party. In 1896 the State Supreme Court approved putting the National Democratic Party on the ballot even though the Democratic Party was already on.


MISSOURI BALLOT ACCESS WIN

On January 27, the Constitution Party won its lawsuit, Constitution Party of Missouri v St. Louis County, e.d., 4:15cv-207. The issue was a county rule that only the two largest parties (as measured by the last gubernatorial vote) could run nominees for County Council. The county agreed that its law is unconstitutional and signed a consent decree.


MISSISSIPPI BALLOT ACCESS WIN

On February 25, the Mississippi Supreme Court ruled 6-3 that Willie Wilson should be put on Democratic presidential primary ballots. The primary is March 8 and many ballots had already been printed, and must now be reprinted. Wilson v Hosemann, 2016-IA-148. Wilson needed 500 signatures and submitted 1,050, but the officials erroneously thought he needed at least 100 signatures from each U.S. House district. The law does not require that, but when Wilson pointed out the error, he wa told it was too late. But, the Court said Wilson was blameless and must not be penalized for a mistake made by others.


ARKANSAS DEFEAT

On February 25, U.S. District Court Judge James Moody refused to enjoin a 2015 Arkansas law that new parties must choose all their nominees (except President) at least one year before the election. Libertarian Party v Martin, e.d., 4:15cv-635.

Old parties nominate by primary in March. The judge says the state has any interest in “preventing voter confusion by limiting ballot access to serious candidates.” He also said that since the Libertarian Party nominated 17 candidates in October, the party is not harmed. He said that the law is fair because Democrats and Republicans must file to run in the March primary by November of the year before the election. However, four times, the U.S. Supreme Court has struck down similar laws, and has said that deadlines for new parties and independent candidates can’t be earlier than the date of primaries. Those cases are from Ohio, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Arkansas. Also in 1996 a U.S. District Court in Arkansas struck down the January petition deadline for new parties. The Moody decision does not mention those cases. The party nominated some more candidates on February 27 and will return to court.


BALLOT ACCESS BILLS

Maryland: on February 24, Delegate Jill Carter introduced HB 1301, which eases the definition of “party” from a group that has registration of approximately 38,000, to a group that has exactly 10,000 members.

New York: on February 4, the Assembly passed SB 9108, which moves the independent petition deadline from August to June 7, which would be the second-earliest presidential deadline in the nation.

Oklahoma: on February 17, the State Senate Rules Committee passed SB 896, which eases the definition of “party” from a group that polled 10% of the vote for the office at the top of the ballot, to 2.5%.

South Dakota: on February 8, the State Senate defeated SB 95. It would have let candidates on a primary ballot with a fee. Currently primary candidates need petitions.

Virginia: on February 9, the House Elections Subcommittee defeated HB 82, which would have eased the definition of “party” from a group that had polled 10% for any statewide race at either of the last two elections, to 5%.

West Virginia: four Delegates have introduced HB 4477, which eases the definition of “Party”. Current law defines it as a group that got 1% for Governor. The bill says a party is also recognized if it has registration of one-tenth of 1%, which would be 1,218 registrants.


FEBRUARY 2016 REGISTRATION TOTALS

The chart below shows the number of registered voters in each party, in each state that has registration by party. In almost every case, the data is from February 2016, but in a few states such data is not available and the data is from the end of 2015.

Parties in the “other” column are: Alaska, 16,499 Alaskan Independence; 1,124 Veterans. California, American Independent 472,019; Peace & Freedom 75,579. Colorado, Unity. Connecticut, Independent Party. Delaware, 4,033 Independent Party; 134 Socialist Workers. Florida, Independent Party 258,914; Independence Party 45,042; America’s Party 681; Ecology 264; Socialism & Liberation 155. Kentucky, Socialist Workers. Louisiana, Conservative 825; Americans Elect 528; Socialist 69; Modern Whig 10; Prohibition 1. Massachusetts, United Independedent; New Jersey, Conservative 703, Natural Law 38, Socialist 25. New Mexico, Independent American 2,168. New York, Independence 431,787; Conservative 147,833; Women’s Equality 602. Oregon, Independent Party 110,358; Progressive 1,906; Americans Elect 454. Rhode Island, Moderate. Utah, Independent American.

~

Dem.

Rep.

Indp, misc

Lib’t.

Green

Consti.

Wk Fam

Reform

other

Alaska

70,596

136,229

280,246

7,486

1,716

266

?

?

17,623

Arizona

933,883

1,113,991

1,167,083

26,706

5,051

?

?

?

461

Calif.

7,438,655

4,767,259

4,267,297

120,578

102,688

338

?

est 15,000

547,598

Colorado

904,913

941,108

1,002,653

24,201

6,943

6,850

?

?

185

Conn.

714,519

406,082

795,409

1,710

1,466

146

314

167

16,847

Delaware

309,007

182,983

155,480

1,191

631

332

454

77

4,167

Dt. Col.

332,561

27,472

73,903

897

3,540

?

?

?

– –

Florida

4,569,788

4,276,104

2,878,468

23,513

5,193

1,084

?

1,542

305,056

Idaho

70,549

298,211

364,355

4,661

?

2,265

?

?

– –

Iowa

586,835

615,763

727,112

5,896

1,690

0

0

0

– –

Kansas

410,881

763,153

535,879

13,444

0

0

0

0

0

Kentucky

1,678,947

1,277,605

251,668

4,987

947

276

?

80

77

Louis’na

1,331,510

828,206

739,367

11,835

2,007

124

0

1,402

1,433

Maine

308,987

262,571

363,245

4,513

40,005

?

?

?

– –

Maryland

2,042,296

974,602

726,581

16,866

8,324

?

?

?

– –

Mass.

1,490,335

468,295

2,282,845

8,352

5,285

98

16

133

16,476

Nebraska

349,613

555,709

235,703

6,984

?

?

?

?

– –

Nevada

471,342

423,308

241,392

9,758

2,100

56,005

?

?

– –

N. Hamp.

229,202

260,896

383,834

?

?

?

?

?

– –

N. Jersey

1,745,680

1,058,583

2,628,726

2,599

1,248

173

?

62

766

N. Mex.

555,443

373,603

261,899

3,160

3,661

209

?

?

2,168

N. York

5,281,140

2,541,267

2,260,515

5,856

23,653

?

43,490

78

580,222

No. Car.

2,630,534

1,964,806

1,825,151

27,903

?

?

?

?

– –

Okla.

882,686

886,153

261,429

?

?

?

?

?

9

Oregon

825,282

642,552

547,228

17,242

9,270

3,550

11,416

?

112,718

Pennsyl.

3,982,559

3,005,080

1,063,110

48,075

13,830

1,497

?

?

– –

Rhode Is.

294,146

77,556

379,049

?

?

?

?

?

2,583

So. Dak.

167,064

238,222

107,493

1,415

?

529

?

?

– –

Utah

114,010

581,186

506,271

7,616

1,103

3,712

?

?

9,684

W. Va.

580,294

359,642

272,434

2,802

1,672

185

?

?

– –

Wyo.

38,708

139,020

21,150

1,004

?

277

?

?

– –

TOTAL 41,341,965 30,447,217 27,606,975 411,250
242,023
77,916
55,690
18,541
1,618,073
Percent

40.60%

29.90%

27.11%

.40%

.24%

.08%

.05%

.02%

1.59%

Totals October 2014 were: Dem. 42,755,625 (41.17%); Rep. 30,938,676 (29.79%); indp. & misc. 27,688,850 (26.67%); Libt. 399,302 (.38%); Green 253,267 (.24%); Consti. 78,434 (.08%); Wk. Fam. 58,757 (.06%); Americans Elect 5,294 (.005%); other parties 1,661,179 (1.60%).

Totals October 2012 were: Dem. 43,512,746 (41.85%), Rep. 31,298,863 (30.10%), indp. & misc. 26,808,810 (25.79%), Libt. 330,811 (.32%), Green 250,682 (.24%), Constitution 77,918 (.07%), Reform 22,880 (.02%), Americans Elect 6,408 (.01%), other parties 1,659,537 (1.60%).

Totals October 2008 were: Dem. 43,933,901 (43.62%), Rep. 30,944,590 (30.72%), indp. & misc. 24,157,259 (23.98%), AIP/Constitution 438,222 (.44%), Green 255,019 (.25%), Libt. 240,328 (.24%), Reform 32,961 (.03%), other parties 675,980 (.67%).

Totals October 2004 were: Dem. 37,301,951 (42.19%), Rep. 28,988,593 (32.79%), Indp. & misc. 20,471,250 (23.15%), Constitution 320,019 (.36%), Green 298,701 (.34%), Libt. 235,521 (.27%), Reform 63,729 (.07%), Natural Law 39,670 (.04%), other parties 695,639 (.79%).

Totals October 1992 were: Dem. 35,616,630 (47.76%), Rep. 24,590,383 (32.97%), indp. & misc. 13,617,167 (18.26%), Green 102,557 (.14%), Libertarian 100,394 (.13%), other parties 554,668 (.74%).


2016 PETITIONING FOR PRESIDENT

STATE
REQUIREMENTS
SIGNATURES COLLECTED
THREE TYPES OF DEADLINES
FULL PARTY
CAND
LIB’T
GREEN
CONSTI
Full Party
Pres Party
Pres. Indp.
Ala.

35,413

5,000

0

0

0

Mar. 1

Mar. 1

Aug. 18

Alaska

(reg) 8,399

#3,005

already on

*1,030

already on

May 2

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Ariz.

20,119

(est) #36,000

already on

already on

0

March 3

Sep. 9

Sep. 9

Ark.

10,000

#1,000

already on

already on

already on

Sep 2 ‘15

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Calif.

(es) (reg) 61,000

178,039

already on

already on

355

Jan. 4

July 11

Aug. 12

Colo.

(reg) 1,000

#pay $1,000

already on

already on

already on

Jan. 8

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Conn.

no procedure

#7,500

*0

*200

0

– –

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Del.

(reg) *653

*6,526

already on

*631

*332

Aug. 20

Aug. 20

July 15

D.C.

no procedure

(est.) #4,600

can’t start

already on

can’t start

– –

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Florida

be organized

119,316

already on

already on

already on

April 15

Sep. 1

July 15

Georgia

51,912

#49,336

already on

in court

in court

July 12

July 12

July 12

Hawaii

707

#4,347

already on

already on

*already on

*Feb. 25

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Idaho

13,047

1,000

already on

0

already on

Aug. 30

Aug. 30

Aug. 24

Illinois

no procedure

#25,000

can’t start

can’t start

can’t start

– –

June 27

June 27

Indiana

no procedure

#26,700

already on

0

0

– –

June 30

June 30

Iowa

no procedure

#1,500

*100

1,200

0

– –

Aug. 19

Aug. 19

Kansas

16,960

5,000

already on

0

0

June 1

June 1

Aug. 1

Ky.

no procedure

#5,000

*in court

0

*in court

– –

Sep. 9

Sep. 9

La.

(reg) 1,000

#pay $500

already on

already on

*124

May 21

Aug. 19

Aug. 19

Maine

(reg) 5,000

#4,000

in court

already on

0

Dec 1 2015

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Md.

10,000

(est.) 38,000

already on

already on

0

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Mass.

(est) (reg) 45,000

#10,000

*0

already on

*0

Feb. 2

Aug. 2

Aug. 2

Mich.

31,519

30,000

already on

already on

already on

July 21

July 21

July 21

Minn.

98,770

#2,000

0

0

0

May 2

Aug. 23

Aug. 23

Miss.

be organized

1,000

already on

already on

already on

Feb. 1

Sep. 9

Sep. 9

Mo.

10,000

10,000

already on

800

already on

July 25

July 25

July 25

Mont.

5,000

#5,000

already on

0

0

Mar. 17

Aug. 17

Aug. 17

Nebr.

5,395

2,500

already on

*475

0

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Nev.

5,431

5,431

already on

*600

already on

June 3

June 3

July 8

N. Hamp.

*14,866

#3,000

0

*260

0

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

N.J.

no procedure

#800

0

0

0

– –

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

N. M.

2,565

15,388

already on

already on

already on

June 30

June 30

June 30

N.Y.

no procedure

#15,000

can’t start

already on

can’t start

– –

Aug. 23

Aug. 23

No. Car.

89,366

89,366

already on

*10,000

0

May 17

May 17

June 9

No. Dak.

7,000

#4,000

already on

0

*1,000

Apr. 16

Sep. 5

Sep. 5

Ohio

30,560

5,000

in court

already on

0

July 6

July 6

Aug. 10

Okla.

24,745

40,047

*finished

*0

0

March 1

July 15

July 15

Oregon

22,046

17,893

already on

already on

already on

Aug. 30

Aug. 30

Aug. 30

Penn.

no procedure

*21,775

*0

*100

*0

– –

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

R.I.

16,203

#1,000

0

0

0

Aug. 1

Sep. 9

Sep. 9

So. Car.

10,000

10,000

already on

already on

already on

May 8

May 8

July 15

So. Dak.

6,936

2,775

*4,000

0

*7,000

Mar. 29

*July 11

Aug. 4

Tenn.

33,816

275

0

in court

in court

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Aug. 18

Texas

47,086

79,939

already on

already on

*0

May 16

May 16

May 9

Utah

2,000

#1,000

already on

*0

already on

Feb. 15

Aug. 15

Aug. 15

Vermont

be organized

#1,000

already on

0

0

Dec 31 ‘15

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Virginia

no procedure

#5,000

0

0

0

– –

Aug. 26

Aug. 26

Wash.

no procedure

#1,000

can’t start

can’t start

can’t start

– –

July 23

July 23

West Va.

no procedure

#6,705

already on

already on

9,650

– –

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Wisc.

10,000

#2,000

already on

already on

already on

April 1

Aug. 2

Aug. 2

Wyo.

3,302

3,302

already on

can’t start

already on

June 1

June 1

Aug. 30

TOTAL STATES ON
31
21*
16*

#partisan label is permitted on the ballot (other than “independent”).
“CONSTI” = Constitution Party.
The number of signatures for new parties is in court in Georgia and Tennessee; for independents, in New Mexico.
The definition of “political party” is in court in Kentucky.
* = change since January 1, 2016 issue.


PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY CANDIDATES WHO GOT ON BALLOTS IN FEBRUARY

DEMOCRATS

CA.

CT.

DEL.

MD.

NEB.

N.M.

N.Y.

PA.

R.I.

W. VA.

Hillary Clinton, NY

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Rocky De La Fuente, California

X

– –

– –

X

– –

– –

– –

X

X

X

Paul T. Farrell, WV

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

X

Henry Hewes, NY

X

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

Keith Judd, Texas

X

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

X

Bernie Sanders, VT

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Michael Steinberg, FL

X

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

Mark Stewart, NH

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

X

– –

Willie Wilson, Illinois

X

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

~
REPUBLICANS
Jeb Bush, Florida

X

X

X

X

– –

X

X

X

X

X

Ben Carson, Florida

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Chris Christie, NJ

X

– –

– –

X

– –

X

– –

– –

X

X

Ted Cruz, Texas

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Carly Fiorina, Virginia

X

– –

– –

X

– –

X

– –

– –

X

X

Jim Gilmore, Virginia

X

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

X

– –

David E. Hall, Florida

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

X

Mike Huckabee, Florida

– –

– –

– –

X

– –

– –

– –

– –

X

X

John Kasich, Ohio

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Rand Paul, Kentucky

– –

– –

– –

X

– –

– –

– –

– –

X

X

Marco Rubio, Florida

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Rick Santorum, Virginia

– –

– –

– –

X

– –

– –

– –

– –

X

– –

Donald Trump, NY

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

~
GREENS
Darryl Cherney, CA

X

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

William Kreml, SC

X

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

Kent Mesplay, Texas

X

– –

– –

– –

– –

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Sedinam Moyowasifa-Curry, CA

X

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Jill Stein, MA

X

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LIBERTARIANS
Marc Allen Feldman, OH

X

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X

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John David Hale, KY

X

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Cecil Ince, Missouri

X

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Gary Johnson, NM

X

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X

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Steve Kerbel, Colorado

X

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X

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John McAfee, Alabama

X

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X

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Darryl Perry, NH

X

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Austin Petersen, MO

X

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X

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Derrick Reid, California

X

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Jack Robinson, SC

X

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Rhett Smith, Texas

X

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Joy Waymire, California

X

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PEACE AND FREEDOM
Lynn Sandra Kahn, MD

X

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Gloria LaRiva, California

X

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Monica Moorehead, NY

X

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AMERICAN INDEPENDENT
Wiley Drake, California

X

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Arthur Harris, Maryland

X

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James Hedges, PA

X

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Tom Hoefling, Michigan

X

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J. R. Myers, Alaska

X

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Robert Ornelas, CA

X

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Alan Spears, California

X

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REPUBLICAN PARTY DONORS ASK CONSULTING FIRM TO ANALYZE BALLOT ACCESS LAWS FOR INDEPENDENT RUN

On January 26, Politico revealed that a group of large donors to the Republican Party had commissioned a study of how independent presidential candidates can get on the ballot. The study was done by a Florida group called Data Targeting. These donors do not support Donald Trump for the Republican nomination and want to know if they could get behind a potential independent candidate.


SOCIALIST WORKERS PARTY TICKET

On February 12, the Socialist Workers Party announced that its national ticket this year is Alyson Kennedy for President, and Osborne Hart for Vice-President. The party has run a ticket in every presidential election starting in 1948. The only other minor parties in U.S. history that have such an unbroken string are the Prohibition Party and the Socialist Labor Party. The SLP stopped after 1976.


NEW PARTY QUALIFIES IN HAWAII

A new party called the “American Shopping Party” has qualified for the Hawaii ballot. It opposes consumerism and takes some of its beliefs from eastern religions. It is not known if it intends to be involved in the presidential race.


ILLINOIS GREEN PARTY PRIVATE PRIMARY RESULTS

The Illinois Green Party is not ballot-qualified, but it holds its own presidential primary, at party expense, for dues-paying party members. The results, announced February 19, are: Jill Stein 119; William P. Kreml 5; Kent Mesplay 2; Sedinam Christin Kinamo Moyowasifza-Curry 1; Darrly Cherney 0; uncommitted 10.


CALIFORNIA SECRETARY OF STATE WON’T PUT JILL STEIN ON PEACE & FREEDOM PARTY PRIMARY

On February 8, California Secretary of State Alex Padilla announced which presidential candidates would appear on the six presidential primary ballots. See the chart on page five to know which candidates he accepted. He refused to list Jill Stein on the Peace & Freedom Party presidential primary ballot, even though PFP had asked him to do that. He did not explain why he left Stein off, and his office refused to release any internal memos on the subject. California has no law preventing a presidential candidate from running in the primary of two parties. In 2008, both Cynthia McKinney and Ralph Nader were on both the California Green Party primary, and the Peace & Freedom primary. Nader won both of those primaries, and he became the nominee of the Peace & Freedom Party.


BERNIE SANDERS CRITICIZES BALLOT ACCESS RESTRICTIONS

On February 18, Bernie Sanders criticized U.S. election laws that bolster the two major parties and discourage all other parties: “I think we should welcome competition.” The occasion was a forum in Las Vegas sponsored by MSNBC and Telemundo.


JIM WEBB WON’T RUN FOR PRESIDENT

On February 11, former U.S. Senator Jim Webb said that he will not run for President as an independent candidate.


FEC 2014 ELECTION RETURNS BOOK

The Federal Election Commission has published its 2014 election returns book. It covers all U.S. Senate and House races, including primaries, and can be obtained free by calling 800-424-9530. The title is “Federal Elections 2014.”


SUBSCRIBING TO BAN WITH PAYPAL

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Ballot Access News is published by and copyright by Richard Winger. Note: subscriptions are available!


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Copyright © 2016 Ballot Access News

Comments

March 2016 Ballot Access News Print Edition — 10 Comments

  1. Once again, the rightmost columns in the tables are getting cut off. I think this is the fourth issue in a row where that has happened. I don’t know how this problem should be solved.

  2. Thanks, Joshua. You’re right. The right-hand one-third of all three charts are cut off. Kevin Hayes will try to fix it.

  3. At least with my browser, there was not a current total number of registered Libertarian elected voters. If I did the sums correctly, it’s 411,250.

  4. M: The problem is not with your browser. The source code for the page does not list the totals in the Democratic, Republican, independent, and Libertarian columns. Those numbers were not posted.

    However, for Richard and Kevin, there is still another problem with the February 2016 Registration Totals table. There is supposed to be an “Other” column to the right of Reform, but it’s not visible except for the first digit of its national total.

  5. Why is the Massachusetts Libertarian party crashing so hard and why did it explode upwards years ago? It’s taking quite the round-trip. 11,715% growth over 12 years, followed immediately by a 65% crash over the next 12 years. 204 members in 1992, 23,900 in 2004, 8,352 now.

  6. Massachusetts prints the names of qualified parties on the voter registration form, with a checkbox for each. The Massachusetts Libertarian Party has not been qualified since November 2010, so its name is no longer on the form. Leaders of the Massachusetts LP believe that the party is better off not being qualified. This is because (1) it is very difficult for members of small qualified parties to get on their own party’s primary ballot; (2) qualified parties must elect state party committeemembers in a government primary.

    The rational solution is for the party to regain qualified status and then it would have standing to challenge both problems in court. Alternatively it is free to lobby state legislators to fix the problem. As to parties being forced to elect committeemembers in a government primary, the party could easily overcome that in court, under the unanimous US Supreme Court precedent Eu v San Francisco County Democratic Central Committee from 1989. It said parties have a freedom of association right to determine their own method of choosing party officers.

  7. OK. I take it that it was qualified in the big run-up years of 1996, 2000, 2002, 2004, and 2010, but not in the big decline years of 2006, 2008, 2012, and 2014. It seems to me that whether or not a checkbox was available on the voter registration form would only be influential on acquiring new registered voters. I don’t see why the party should be shedding registered voters so rapidly. I’m surprised that normal turnover is so high. I assumed it would look more like a steep run-up and then a plateau and then a slow, gradual decline. Instead, voter registration just immediately fell off a cliff. The party is shrinking by 15% – 35% every other year. I must live in an island of stability if one in five voters typically changes their voter registration every other year.

  8. So I’m going over this data, which seems to be hard to come by. Where are these numbers sourced from?

    I’m tracking down numbers for the states you’re missing. Happy to share what I find.

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