June 2016 Ballot Access News Print Edition

Ballot Access News
June 1, 2016 – Volume 32, Number 1

This issue was printed on blue paper.


Table of Contents

  1. U.S. DISTRICT COURT GRANTS INJUNCTIVE RELIEF AGAINST MAINE DEADLINE FOR NEW PARTIES
  2. OKLAHOMA GOVERNOR SIGNS BALLOT ACCESS
  3. COURTS IN FOUR STATES WILL DECIDE BALLOT ACCESS SOON
  4. MAJOR PARTIES FIGHT TO ALTER PRIMARIES
  5. LEGISLATIVE NEWS
  6. CALIFORNIA LAWSUITS OVER PARTY LABELS
  7. BOOK REVIEW: PRIMARY SCREENOUT
  8. 2016 PETITIONING FOR PRESIDENT
  9. LIBERTARIAN PRESIDENTIAL CONVENTION
  10. LIBERTARIAN PRESIDENTIAL VOTE
  11. LIBERTARIAN VICE-PRESIDENTIAL VOTE
  12. ANTI-TRUMP REPUBLICANS MAY RUN DAVID FRENCH FOR PRESIDENT
  13. LIBERTY UNION NOMINATES
  14. AMERICAN PARTY NOMINATES
  15. NEW PRESIDENT OF AUSTRIA IS A GREEN PARTY MEMBER
  16. CONNECTICUT DEMOCRATS CROSS-ENDORSE A GREEN PARTY NOMINEE
  17. SUBSCRIBING TO BAN WITH PAYPAL

U.S. DISTRICT COURT GRANTS INJUNCTIVE RELIEF AGAINST MAINE DEADLINE FOR NEW PARTIES

On May 27, U.S. District Court Judge John A. Woodcock, a Bush Jr. appointee, issued an order enjoining Maine’s deadline for newly-qualifying parties to get on the ballot. He also said that the Libertarian Party, the only party that tried to qualify in Maine this year, may have until July 12 to finish getting its needed 5,000 registered members. Libertarian Party of Maine v Dunlap, 2:16cv-2.

The law says new parties must obtain their registrants by December 1 of the year before the election. The order says, "Plaintiffs have shown a likelihood of success on their claim that Maine’s party-certification deadline of December 1 is unconstitutionally early."

The order also criticizes the state for having no method for a new party to contest a finding that it failed to obtain 5,000 registered members. The Libertarian Party had submitted 6,482 registration forms by the deadline, but election officials had rejected 1,969 of them, mostly because the handwriting on the registration cards was illegible, or because some blank on the form had not been filled out. As the order says, the Libertarian Party had no means to contest these disqualifications except by filing the lawsuit. By contrast, candidates have an administrative procedure to re-validate petitions, if they are told initially disqualified.

Judge Woodcock had refused injunctive relief on April 25. It is very rare to persuade any judge to change his or her mind, but the Libertarian Party had asked for reconsideration, and it worked. The judge said that when he issued his April 25 ruling, he had thought the party was asking to participate in the June primary, but the party was able to show that this was a misunderstanding.

When the Secretary of State had rejected the party’s filing in December 2015, he had also had all the Libertarian registrants converted to independents, without even asking them first. The order does not require election officials to change these applicants back to Libertarians. It is not clear what will happen once the party does qualify. The party has already obtained more than 487 new Libertarian registrations, and those registration forms will be submitted soon. The party expects to be qualified by mid-June.

The order does not require the state to print the names of the Libertarians who are running for U.S. House on the November ballot. It says that they have not shown any support within their districts. There is no U.S. Senate race in Maine this year, nor any other statewide office besides President. The decision may help other pending lawsuits over early deadlines, in Arkansas, Arizona, and South Dakota.

This decision is the first ballot access win for minor parties or independent candidates in Maine since 1986. That year, an independent candidate for Governor, Sherry Huber, won a decision in state court that it was unconstitutional for Maine to deprive independent candidates of any ballot label whatsoever. Even the word "independent" wasn’t permitted.


OKLAHOMA GOVERNOR SIGNS BALLOT ACCESS

On May 5, Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin signed SB 896, which eases the law on how a party remains on the ballot. It lowers the vote test from 10% to 2.5%. The only two states that still have 10% vote tests are New Jersey and Virginia.


COURTS IN FOUR STATES WILL DECIDE BALLOT ACCESS SOON

Decisions are expected in the next few weeks on whether to put certain parties on the ballot.

Kentucky: a decision is expected any day over whether the state must have a procedure for a group to turn itself into a qualified party before any particular election. Libertarian Party v Grimes, e.d., 3:15cv-86.

Ohio: the Sixth Circuit is about to decide whether the Libertarian Party should be restored to the ballot. On May 20, a U.S. District Court ruled against the party. The issue is whether the state used discriminatory enforcement when it kept the party’s gubernatorial candidate off the Libertarian primary ballot in 2014. Libertarian Party of Ohio v Husted, 16-3537.

The party also has a lawsuit pending in state court, over whether the 2013 law that is keeping the party off the ballot violates the State Constitution. However, there is no indication that this case will have a decision soon. Libertarian Party of Ohio v Husted, Franklin Co., 16-cv-554.

Pennsylvania: the Constitution, Green, and Libertarian Parties are asking the Third Circuit to put them on the ballot. All the briefs will have been filed by June 10. On May 19, a U.S. District Court had ruled that only the Third Circuit can decide this case. Constitution Party of Pennsylvania v Cortes, 15-3046.

Tennessee: the Constitution and Green Parties will ask for injunctive relief, putting them on the ballot, on June 8. Green Party of Tennessee v Hargett, 3:11cv-692. The Libertarian Party may intervene in this case.


MAJOR PARTIES FIGHT TO ALTER PRIMARIES

Alaska: on May 15, the Democratic Party held a state convention, and amended its bylaws to say that a registered independent is free to run in the Democratic primary for Congress or state office. State law does not permit such candidacy. Eventually the party will sue the state to put its new bylaw into effect. The party already lost a lawsuit on this in April, but the reason was that the party hadn’t yet changed its bylaws, so it didn’t have standing.

Hawaii: on May 4, the Democratic Party argued in the Ninth Circuit in Democratic Party of Hawaii v Nago, 13-17545. State law requires all parties to nominate by open primary, but the Democratic Party argues that Republicans are voting in its primaries, and wants to limit the primary to people who sign in as Democrats. The U.S. District Court had ruled against the party on the grounds that it hadn’t proved that Republicans are voting in its primaries. The party argues that it is impossible to obtain such proof, because on primary day, voters choose a primary ballot in secret.

Missouri: on May 21-22, the Republican Party held its state convention, and voted to seek a closed primary for itself, either by legislative action or by lawsuit.

Montana: the Republican Party has been suing to obtain a closed primary for itself. It was set to argue in the Ninth Circuit on May 4, but then cancelled the hearing and put its own lawsuit on hold until the Ninth Circuit decides the Hawaii case.

Utah: the Republican Party has asked the Tenth Circuit to hear its appeal in Utah Republican Party v Herbert, 16-4058. The issue is the state law that allows individuals to get on a primary ballot even if they have little support at a party caucus. However, such candidates must complete a very difficult petition. The Republican Party wants to block such candidates from its primaries.


LEGISLATIVE NEWS

California: on May 23, the State Senate passed SB 1288 by 23-12. It lets all cities and counties, not just charter cities and counties, use Instant Runoff Voting for their own elections.

Minnesota: on May 22, Governor Mark Dayton signed SF 2985, which establishes presidential primaries in future years. Any qualified party would have such a primary, although only the two largest parties would have the ability to set the date. If they don’t agree, the primary would be the first Tuesday in March.

Minnesota (2): on May 22, the Governor also signed SF 2381, the omnibus election law bill. Unfortunately, on May 20, the bill had been amended to eliminate the two ballot access improvements. One of the improvements was to delete the wording on the independent candidate petition that suggested signers should not vote in the upcoming primary. The other would have decreased the number of signatures for independent candidates in special elections.


CALIFORNIA LAWSUITS OVER PARTY LABELS

Two federal lawsuits are pending over California’s restrictive election laws concerning ballot labels, both in the Ninth Circuit.

The first case, Soltysik v Padilla, concerns the law that won’t allow candidates to show their party on the ballot, unless they are members of a qualified party. The plaintiffs lost in U.S. District Court on April 22 and have since appealed to the Ninth Circuit. They are registered "Socialist" but the law requires their ballot label to be "Party preference: none."

The other case, Independent Party v Padilla, lost in U.S. District Court on May 4. Judge William Shubb, a Bush Jr. appointee, upheld the action of the Secretary of State in refusing to let the Independent Party try to get on the ballot.

In California new parties qualify by obtaining approximately 60,000 registered members. Chances are the party already has that many registered members, but the Secretary of State refuses to produce the data, because he says it would cause confusion if a party named Independent Party were to qualify. The judge said there "might": be confusion, and he ignored all the evidence that there has been little confusion in the eleven other states that have a ballot-qualified party named "Independent Party", or had one recently.

The Independent Party of Oregon has said it is willing to file an amicus brief in the Ninth Circuit, on the side of the Independent Party of California.


BOOK REVIEW: PRIMARY SCREENOUT

Primary Screenout, by Patrick J. Dixon. Amazon price: $15.00. 284 pages, paperback.

Patrick Dixon has written a very useful and also a very funny account of how he went from being not interested in politics, to being state chair of the Texas Libertarian Party for ten event-filled years. The title refers to the unique Texas law that won’t let primary voters sign a petition for an independent candidate or a party to get on the ballot. The book describes the Libertarian Party’s struggle to get back on the ballot in 2004, after it went off the ballot in November 2002 for failing to get 5% of the vote in any statewide race.

But the book is about far more than just ballot access. It tells the story of how a minor party in this country, without professional expert staff, learns to publicize itself, raise money, organize a functioning state committee, finds candidates and helps them know how to campaign. Best of all, the book is written as Dixon’s own adventure in trying to accomplish these goals. I frequently laughed out loud as I was reading it. This book is recommended for anyone else active in the leadership of a political party.


2016 PETITIONING FOR PRESIDENT

STATE
REQUIREMENTS
SIGNATURES COLLECTED
THREE TYPES OF DEADLINES
FULL PARTY
CAND
LIB’T
GREEN
CONSTI
Full Party
Pres Party
Pres. Indp.

Ala.

35,413

5,000

0

0

*200

Mar. 1

Mar. 1

Aug. 18

Alaska

(reg) 8,399

#3,005

already on

*2,450

already on

May 2

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Ariz.

20,119

* #35,514

already on

already on

0

March 3

Sep. 9

Sep. 9

Ark.

10,000

#1,000

already on

already on

already on

Sep 2 ‘15

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Calif.

(es) (reg) 61,000

178,039

already on

already on

*340

Jan. 4

July 11

Aug. 12

Colo.

(reg) 1,000

#pay $1,000

already on

already on

already on

Jan. 8

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Conn.

no procedure

#7,500

*1,300

*1,100

0

– –

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Del.

(reg) *654

*6,526

already on

*600

*318

Aug. 20

Aug. 20

July 15

D.C.

no procedure

(est.) #4,600

can’t start

already on

can’t start

– –

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Florida

be organized

119,316

already on

already on

already on

April 15

Sep. 1

July 15

Georgia

*7,500

*#7,500

already on

*500

*500

July 12

July 12

July 12

Hawaii

707

#4,347

already on

already on

already on

*Feb. 25

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Idaho

13,047

1,000

already on

0

already on

Aug. 30

Aug. 30

Aug. 24

Illinois

no procedure

#25,000

*12,500

*12,000

*200

– –

June 27

June 27

Indiana

no procedure

#26,700

already on

0

0

– –

June 30

June 30

Iowa

no procedure

#1,500

*600

1,200

*100

– –

Aug. 19

Aug. 19

Kansas

16,960

5,000

already on

1,000

0

June 1

June 1

Aug. 1

Ky.

no procedure

#5,000

in court

0

in court

– –

Sep. 9

Sep. 9

La.

(reg) 1,000

#pay $500

already on

already on

124

May 21

Aug. 19

Aug. 19

Maine

(reg) 5,000

#4,000

*finished

already on

0

Dec 1 2015

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Md.

10,000

*40,603

already on

already on

0

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Mass.

(est) (reg) 45,000

#10,000

0

already on

0

Feb. 2

Aug. 2

Aug. 2

Mich.

31,519

30,000

already on

already on

already on

July 21

July 21

July 21

Minn.

98,770

#2,000

0

0

0

May 2

Aug. 23

Aug. 23

Miss.

be organized

1,000

already on

already on

already on

Feb. 1

Sep. 9

Sep. 9

Mo.

10,000

10,000

already on

*400

already on

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Mont.

5,000

#5,000

already on

0

0

Mar. 17

Aug. 17

Aug. 17

Nebr.

5,395

2,500

already on

500

0

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Nev.

5,431

5,431

already on

*finished

already on

June 3

June 3

July 8

N. Hamp.

*14,866

#3,000

0

*410

0

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

N.J.

no procedure

#800

0

*200

finished

– –

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

N. M.

2,565

15,388

already on

already on

already on

June 30

June 30

June 30

N.Y.

no procedure

#15,000

can’t start

already on

can’t start

– –

Aug. 2

Aug. 2

No. Car.

89,366

89,366

already on

*0

0

May 17

May 17

June 9

No. Dak.

7,000

#4,000

already on

0

0

Apr. 16

Sep. 5

Sep. 5

Ohio

30,560

5,000

in court

already on

0

July 6

July 6

Aug. 10

Okla.

24,745

40,047

already on

0

0

March 1

July 15

July 15

Oregon

22,046

17,893

already on

already on

already on

Aug. 30

Aug. 30

Aug. 30

Penn.

no procedure

*21,775

*8,000

*4,500

*0

– –

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

R.I.

16,203

#1,000

0

0

0

Aug. 1

Sep. 9

Sep. 9

So. Car.

10,000

10,000

already on

already on

already on

May 8

May 8

July 15

So. Dak.

6,936

2,775

*finished

0

already on

Mar. 29

July 11

Aug. 4

Tenn.

33,816

275

*2,000

in court

in court

Aug. 10

Aug. 10

Aug. 18

Texas

47,086

79,939

already on

already on

0

May 22

May 22

May 9

Utah

2,000

#1,000

already on

0

already on

Feb. 15

Aug. 15

Aug. 15

Vermont

be organized

#1,000

already on

0

0

Dec 31 ‘15

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Virginia

no procedure

#5,000

*1,050

*850

0

– –

Aug. 26

Aug. 26

Wash.

no procedure

#1,000

*0

*750

*0

– –

July 23

July 23

West Va.

no procedure

#6,705

already on

already on

9,650

– –

Aug. 1

Aug. 1

Wisc.

10,000

#2,000

already on

already on

already on

April 1

Aug. 2

Aug. 2

Wyo.

3,302

3,302

already on

0

already on

June 1

June 1

Aug. 30

TOTAL STATES ON
32
21
17

#partisan label is permitted on the ballot (other than "independent").
"CONSTI" = Constitution Party.
The number of signatures for new parties is in court in Tennessee; for independents, in New Mexico.
* = change since April 1, 2016 issue.


LIBERTARIAN PRESIDENTIAL CONVENTION

The Libertarian Party held its presidential convention in Orlando, Florida, May 26-30, and nominated on May 29. The candidates for President were Gary Johnson, Austin Petersen, John McAfee, Darryl Perry, Marc Allan Feldman, and Kevin McCormick. No one received a majority on the first ballot, but Gary Johnson received a majority on the second ballot.

The vice-presidential candidates were William Weld, Larry Sharpe, Will Coley, Derrick Grayson, and Alicia Dearn. No one received a majority on the first ballot, but Weld won on the second ballot.

Both Johnson and Weld are former two-term Republican Governors. Weld was Governor of Massachusetts 1990-1998. Johnson was New Mexico Governor 1994-2002. The Libertarian ticket is the first one to include two Governors or former Governors since 1948. In 1948, the Republican ticket included the Governors of New York and California; and the States Rights "Dixiecrat" ticket included the Governors of South Carolina and Mississippi.

The votes, by state, are below. Every state had delegates except for Oregon. Press credentials were requested by 250 outlets, because it is unusual for a party, other than the Democratic and Republican Parties, to entertain nominees with that much government experience.

Weld is acquainted with Ohio Governor John Kasich, and Weld has promised to try to contact Kasich and ask why Kasich has been so hostile to having the Libertarian Party on the Ohio ballot. Kasich’s campaign spent $592,000 in 2014 in legal bills in an attempt to keep the party from being on the ballot in the gubernatorial election. Weld registered as a member of the Libertarian Party in early May, 2016. He is still a Massachusetts resident.


LIBERTARIAN PRESIDENTIAL CONVENTION VOTE

~
1st BALLOT
2nd BALLOT

STATE

JOHNSON

PETERSN

McAFEE

PERRY

FELDM

McCOR

JOHNSON

PETERSN

McAFEE

PERRY

FELDMAN

Ala

7

1

3

2

0

0

9

1

2

1

0

Alas

0

5

0

0

1

0

0

5

0

0

1

Ariz

11

2

7

2

2

2

11

4

8

2

0

Ark

4

0

3

0

1

0

5

0

4

0

0

Cal

48

33

21

4

4

3

56

33

25

2

1

Colo

17

2

1

2

0

0

17

1

1

3

1

Ct

3

4

3

0

0

0

4

4

0

1

0

Del

1

1

0

0

0

1

1

2

0

0

0

DC

3

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

0

Fla

28

13

3

5

4

0

31

12

5

3

2

Ga

9

5

8

4

5

0

10

8

10

2

1

Hi

4

1

0

0

0

0

4

1

0

0

0

Id

6

1

0

0

0

0

6

1

0

0

2

Ill

19

4

3

1

0

0

19

4

3

1

2

Ind

18

9

4

2

1

0

24

8

1

0

1

Iowa

3

3

1

0

2

1

4

5

2

0

0

Kan

2

2

0

1

0

0

2

4

0

0

0

Ky

7

0

3

0

1

0

8

0

3

0

0

La

4

8

0

0

0

0

4

8

0

1

0

Me

2

5

0

0

0

0

2

5

0

0

0

Md

10

2

0

2

4

0

10

0

1

2

2

Mass

8

0

3

0

0

0

8

0

3

0

0

Mich

15

1

5

1

2

0

16

1

4

2

1

Minn

5

2

0

2

0

0

8

1

0

1

0

Miss

6

1

1

0

0

0

6

1

1

0

0

Mo

7

12

1

1

1

1

10

13

0

1

0

Mt

1

2

2

1

1

0

2

2

3

0

0

Neb

2

6

0

0

0

0

2

5

0

0

0

Nev

11

1

0

0

0

0

11

2

2

0

0

NH

1

1

2

5

0

0

2

1

4

3

0

NJ

9

3

5

2

2

0

11

3

4

2

1

NM

11

0

0

2

0

0

12

1

0

0

0

NY

16

16

3

3

1

0

20

15

1

3

0

NoC

18

3

2

1

4

1

19

5

3

1

1

NoD

1

2

2

0

0

0

2

1

2

0

0

Ohio

21

9

3

0

8

0

21

9

7

0

3

Ok

2

1

1

1

1

0

3

3

0

0

0

Pa

16

6

4

12

3

0

18

7

4

12

0

RI

3

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

0

SoC

9

4

0

0

0

0

8

4

0

1

0

SoD

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

Tn

14

0

3

1

0

0

14

0

3

1

0

Tex

26

10

15

2

7

0

34

8

12

3

2

Ut

2

2

2

0

1

0

5

3

0

0

0

Vt

0

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

Va

19

6

2

2

1

0

21

5

2

2

0

Wa

13

3

10

0

1

0

13

3

10

0

1

WV

0

5

0

0

0

0

1

4

0

0

0

Wi

13

0

2

1

0

0

15

0

0

1

0

Wy

2

0

0

1

0

0

2

0

0

1

0

TOT

458

197

131

63

58

9

518

203

131

52

18


LIBERTARIAN VICE-PRESIDENTIAL CONVENTION VOTE

~
1st BALLOT
2nd BALLOT

STATE

WELD

SHARPE

COLEY

GRAYSON

DEARN

WELD

SHARPE

GRAYSON

Alabama

5

4

2

0

0

6

6

0

Alaska

0

1

3

2

0

0

6

0

Arizona

12

10

2

1

0

12

12

0

Ark.

3

2

0

3

0

4

2

2

Calif.

49

28

10

4

7

49

51

1

Colo.

15

4

3

2

0

16

6

1

Conn.

3

3

2

1

1

2

6

1

Del.

0

0

0

0

2

1

1

0

D.C.

3

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

Florida

29

13

5

4

1

31

22

0

Georgia

12

4

10

4

0

10

20

1

Hawaii

4

1

0

0

0

5

0

0

Idaho

6

1

0

0

0

6

1

0

Illinois

15

4

3

3

0

14

9

1

Indiana

22

7

1

1

0

22

12

0

Iowa

4

4

1

1

0

4

6

0

Kansas

1

2

1

1

1

1

4

0

Ky.

6

3

0

0

0

7

3

0

La.

3

8

1

1

1

2

11

0

Maine

3

0

0

0

0

3

3

0

Md.

7

6

2

2

0

1

10

0

Massa.

8

2

1

1

0

8

3

0

Mich.

15

1

5

5

4

18

6

0

Minn.

6

2

1

1

0

5

3

0

Miss.

0

8

0

0

0

8

0

0

Mo.

8

10

2

2

0

7

16

0

Montana

2

4

0

0

0

1

6

0

Nebraska

1

7

0

0

0

1

7

0

Nevada

10

4

0

0

0

11

3

0

N.H.

1

5

3

1

0

0

10

0

N.J.

10

5

2

1

0

11

7

0

N.M.

10

0

0

0

0

10

0

0

N.Y.

8

30

3

0

0

9

31

0

No. C.

11

6

3

2

3

15

10

0

No. D.

2

0

1

1

0

3

2

0

Ohio

17

5

6

4

4

11

22

0

Okla.

1

5

0

0

0

1

5

0

Pa.

16

9

11

2

0

18

20

0

R.I.

3

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

So. C.

5

6

0

0

0

5

6

0

So. D.

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

Tenn.

13

2

0

0

0

14

2

2

Texas

24

27

2

0

2

28

29

0

Utah

5

0

0

0

1

5

2

0

Vt.

0

1

2

0

0

0

3

0

Va.

19

7

1

0

1

18

7

0

Wash.

13

12

0

0

1

14

12

0

W.Va.

0

1

3

0

0

0

5

0

Wisc.

12

0

1

0

0

13

1

0

Wyo.

3

0

0

0

0

4

0

0

TOTAL

426

264

93

48

29

441

409

9


ANTI-TRUMP REPUBLICANS MAY RUN DAVID FRENCH FOR PRESIDENT

Republican leaders who don’t like Donald Trump are trying to persuade David French to run as an independent. He is an attorney in Columbia, Tennessee, and a writer for National Review.


LIBERTY UNION NOMINATES

On May 8, the Liberty Union Party of Vermont, which is on the ballot, nominated Gloria La Riva for President and Eugene Puryear for Vice-President. They are also the nominees of the Party for Socialism and Liberation.


AMERICAN PARTY NOMINATES

On May 15, the American Party of South Carolina, which is on the ballot, nominated Dr. Peter Skewes for President. The vice-presidential candidate has not yet been chosen. Skewes is a veterinarian and a professor at Clemson University. The American Party holds itself out as centrist.


NEW PRESIDENT OF AUSTRIA IS A GREEN PARTY MEMBER

On May 22, Austria held a presidential run-off. Alexander Van der Bellen was elected with 50.3% of the vote. He is the former leader of the Green Party of Austria, and is still a member. His ballot label was "independent".


CONNECTICUT DEMOCRATS CROSS-ENDORSE A GREEN PARTY NOMINEE

On May 17, Connecticut Democrats nominated Bonnie Troy for Assembly, 135th district. She is a member of the Green Party and already had the Green Party nomination for the same seat. Connecticut lets two parties jointly nominate the same candidate, so she will be on the November ballot twice.


SUBSCRIBING TO BAN WITH PAYPAL

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Comments

June 2016 Ballot Access News Print Edition — 5 Comments

  1. The Libertarian Convention Presidential and Vice-Presidential votes go off the page.

  2. Unfortunately, the problem of columns in tables being cut off has recurred. Looking at the source of this page, I can see that there are supposed to be columns for McAfee, Perry, and Feldman on the 2nd Libertarian presidential ballot. But those three columns have been cut off in the display.

    I don’t know what can be done about this, but this same problem has been recurring in the print editions as displayed here for the last few issues. It wasn’t a problem before the last site redesign.

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