August 2017 Ballot Access News Print Edition

Ballot Access News
August 1, 2017 – Volume 33, Number 3

This issue was printed on green paper.


Table of Contents

  1. MINOR PARTIES GAIN REGISTRATIONS DURING 2017, BUT DEMOCRATS, REPUBLICANS, AND INDEPENDENTS DECLINE
  2. ARIZONA LOSS
  3. MICHIGAN REMOVES PARTY LOGOS
  4. OREGON NATIONAL POPULAR VOTE BILL DIES
  5. CALIFORNIA LEGISLATIVE NEWS
  6. OTHER LEGISLATIVE NEWS
  7. LAWSUIT NEWS
  8. ALTERNATE VOTING SYSTEMS
  9. BOOK REVIEW: A MAGNIFICENT CATASTROPHE
  10. MODERATE CALIFORNIA GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDATE DROPS OUT
  11. CONGRESSIONAL BILL TO EX-FELONS
  12. MID-2017 VOTER REGISTRATION TOTALS
  13. 2017 PARTY REVENUE FROM STATE INCOME TAX “CHECK-OFF”
  14. PARTY REVENUE FROM STATE INCOME TAX “CHECK-OFF” FOR THE ENTIRE NATION THROUGH HISTORY, 2000-2017
  15. NEBRASKA SENATOR WILL FORM NEW POLITICAL PARTY
  16. U.S. SENATE COMMITTEE WANTS TO KNOW ABOUT JILL STEIN
  17. LOUISIANA ELECTION
  18. LIBERTARIANS GAIN OFFICE-HOLDERS IN NEW YORK AND MISSISSIPPI
  19. LIBERTARIAN PARTY NOW BALLOT-QUALIFIED IN ARKANSAS
  20. ELLIOT TRAIMAN, LONG-TIME COFOE BOARD MEMBER, DIES
  21. VIRGINIA 2017 ELECTION
  22. SUBSCRIBING TO BAN WITH PAYPAL

MINOR PARTIES GAIN REGISTRATIONS DURING 2017, BUT DEMOCRATS, REPUBLICANS, AND INDEPENDENTS DECLINE

During 2017, the number of voters registered as Democrats declined; the number of Republicans declined; the number of independents declined. But the number of voters registered into minor parties increased. See page four for a state-by-state breakdown. The data includes the 31 states in which the voter registration form asks the applicant to choose a party (or to choose independent status). The data also includes the District of Columbia. Obviously there can be no registration data from the other 19 states, because in those other 19 states, there is no such thing as a registered member of a political party.

It is normal for the number of registered voters to decline in odd years, because states cull their voter registration lists after election years. When this article discusses changes, it is comparing current data to the November 2016 data. All of the 2017 data is as of June or July, with these exceptions: the California data is from February 2017; the Pennsylvania data is from April 2017; the Florida minor party data is from November 2016; the Connecticut data is from November 2016; and the Massachusetts data for the unqualified parties is from November 2016. The Secretaries of State of Connecticut and Florida say they are hoping to be able to furnish complete registration data for all parties, on demand, in the future, but currently they cannot do that. Current Connecticut data can only be obtained by contacting each town clerk, and I didn’t do that work.

Libertarian registration is now higher than it has ever been. Although Green Party and Constitution Party registration increased between November 2016 and mid-2017, in the past those parties had higher registration totals than they do now.


ARIZONA LOSS

On July 10, U.S. District Court Judge David G. Campbell, a Bush Jr. appointee, upheld a 2015 Arizona law that had the effect in 2016 of keeping almost all Libertarian Party nominees off the ballot, but did not injure the Republican, Democratic, or Green Parties. Arizona Libertarian Party v Reagan, 2:16cv-1019.

The 2015 law increased the number of signatures needed for a member of the Libertarian Party to get on the primary ballot approximately twenty-fold. It also increased the number of write-ins needed in the primary for a candidate to be considered nominated by twenty times. But it allows Greens to win a write-in nomination with only one write-in in the Green primary, assuming no opponent receives any votes.

Judge Campbell wrote that the new law is not discriminatory because the legislature had no intent to discriminate. There is strong evidence that showed the legislature consciously intended to injure the Libertarian Party, but the judge excluded this evidence for various procedural reasons. On July 21, the Libertarian Party filed a notice of appeal to the Ninth Circuit.

The decision rests on U.S. Supreme Court precedents Jenness v Fortson and Munro v Socialist Workers Party. However, in those decisions, the Supreme Court was considering difficult requirements to get on the general election ballot, whereas this Arizona case concerns access to a primary ballot. Also in both those U.S. Supreme Court opinions, the Supreme Court noted that various candidates had been able to comply with the challenged requirements.

In Jenness the Supreme Court noted that petitions had succeeded in 1966 and 1968, and the case had been filed in 1970. In Munro, the Supreme Court noted that 41 minor party and independent candidates had successfully qualified for the November ballot.

Judge Campbell disguised the fact that in the Munro decision, so many minor party and independent candidates got on the November ballot. He only quoted from the part of the Munro decision that concerned statewide candidates. He ignored footnote eleven, which had the data for the non-statewide offices.

In 2016, only one Arizona Libertarian complied with the new law, so even though the party remains a qualified party in Arizona (because it has registration greater than the legal requirement) it has virtually been removed from the ballot. The new law had no effect on presidential candidates, however.


MICHIGAN REMOVES PARTY LOGOS

On July 26, HB 4177 became law. It removes party logos from the ballot. A logo is a cartoon, representing a party’s identity. The Michigan Republican logo is a drawing of Abraham Lincoln and Ronald Reagan.

The motive for removing the logos is to help the state win the lawsuit on whether the straight-ticket device should exist. In early 2016 the legislature repealed the straight-ticket device, but then some voters filed a lawsuit, saying removing the device will cause some voters to think that if they draw a circle around a logo, then they are casting a straight-ticket vote for all the nominees of the party. But with the logos removed, that argument vanishes.


OREGON NATIONAL POPULAR VOTE BILL DIES

During 2017, no new state passed the National Popular Vote Plan bill. The Oregon legislature killed the bills, SB 825 and HB 2927, on July 7. The House had passed it, but the Senate did not. Both houses of the Oregon legislature have Democratic majorities, and Oregon has a Democratic Governor. However, the leader of the Senate said he would only support the bill if it called for the voters to decide whether to pass the plan, and supporters of the plan were not interested in that compromise. The other state in which supporters of the plan had hoped to gain during 2017, Connecticut, also has Democratic majorities in both houses of the legislature and a Democratic Governor, and the Connecticut bill, HB HB 5434, had made some headway, but the legislature went home without passing it.


CALIFORNIA LEGISLATIVE NEWS

Primary date bill: SB 568, the bill to move the primary for all office, in all election years, from June to March, continued to advance during July. It passed the Assembly Appropriations Committee on July 19. It had already passed the Senate and the Assembly Elections Committee, although assuming it passes the Assembly, it must return to the State Senate for consideration of the amendment the Assembly added, making the change effective in midterm years as well as presidential years. The legislature went on summer vacation in late July but returns on August 21.

Bill informing independents of their choices: AB 837, the bill to guarantee that election officials fully inform independent voters that they can choose the presidential primary ballot of the Democratic, Libertarian and American Independent Parties, passed the Senate Appropriations Committee on July 10.

Presidential Candidate Tax Returns: SB 149, the bill to require presidential primary candidates to reveal their income tax returns, passed the Assembly Elections Committee on July 13. The bill has no effect on independent presidential candidates, but does apply to write-in candidates.


OTHER LEGISLATIVE NEWS

Illinois: the legislature sent SB 1933 to Governor Bruce Rauner on June 29. It says that all adult citizens known to exist will automatically be registered, unless the individual declines. As of the date this newsletter is being printed, he has not acted on the bill. He earlier said he would sign it on a particular day, but then he didn’t act on that day. He must decide by July 29. He is a Republican.

Rhode Island: Governor Gina Raimondo signed HB 5702 on July 19. This is a bill to automatically register every adult citizen, similar to the Illinois bill.


LAWSUIT NEWS

Alabama: the Eleventh Circuit will hear Hall v Merrill, 16-16766, the week of October 23-27. This is the case over it is constitutional to require independent candidates, and newly-qualifying parties, to submit a petition of 3% of the last gubernatorial vote in special U.S. House elections. The U.S. District Court had ruled that because there is so little time to petition in special elections, the state must reduce the number of signatures. Generally the requirement is about 7,000 signatures.

Arkansas: on July 25, the state asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse the Eighth Circuit decision Moore v Martin. The Eighth Circuit had ruled that the March petition deadline for non-presidential independent candidates is unconstitutional, unless the state can show that it needs the deadline to be that early so as to have enough time to check the petitions.

The last time any state asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear a ballot access case that had been won by a minor party or independent in the court below was in 2013. In 2013, Virginia had asked the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn the Fourth Circuit ruling in Libertarian Party of Virginia v Judd. In that decision, the Fourth Circuit struck down the ban on out-of-state circulators. The U.S. Supreme Court didn’t accept the case, and hasn’t accepted a ballot access case involving minor parties or independent candidates since 1991.

California: a U.S. District Court in Los Angeles will hear De La Fuente v Padilla on August 21. This is the case that challenges the law forcing independent presidential candidates to submit almost 200,000 signatures.

California (2): on July 20, proponenets of a recall against a State Senator filed a lawsuit against the new law that changes the rules for recalls, and makes them more difficult. The lawsuit says it violates due process to change the rules in a restrictive way, in the middle of a petition drive. Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association v Padilla, in the State Appeals Court, 3rd district.

Indiana: on May 31, Andrew Straw, who is the Disability Party nominee for Secretary of State in 2018, filed a federal lawsuit against the law that requires him to submit 26,700 signatures to get on the ballot. He is unable to stand, and argues that the federal law protecting disabled persons from state government discrimination, means that the petition requirement violates federal law. Straw v State, s.d., 1:17cv-1797.

Montana: on July 25, U.S. District Court Judge Brian Morris issued a permanent injunction, limiting the number of signatures that can be required for independent candidates and the nominees of unqualified parties in special congressional elections to 80 per day. Thus, if the petitioning period is only 10 days, the state can require only 800 signatures. Breck v Stapleton, 9:17cv-36. The state will not appeal.


ALTERNATE VOTING SYSTEMS

California: on July 19, the Santa Clara city council asked the city attorney to draft a ballot question, which would ask voters if they want to use proportional representation for future city council elections. There would be two districts, and each district would elect three city councilmembers, using Single Transferable Vote. A candidate could be elected with support from 25% of the voters. The same system was used in New York city 1937-1945, and is used in several foreign countries.

New Mexico: on July 26, the city council voted 6-3 not to use Ranked Choice voting for the March 2018 city elections. The voters approved the idea in 2008, but the vote-counting machines won’t be certified until September 2017, so the system can’t be used until 2020.

Tennessee: on July 27, election officials in Memphis said the 2019 election for city council will use Ranked Choice Voting. The decision to use RCV had been made ten years ago, but it took all that time for the city to obtain vote-counting machines that can handle RCV.


BOOK REVIEW: A MAGNIFICENT CATASTROPHE

A Magnificent Catastrophe, The Tumulttuous Election of 1800, by Edward J. Larson, 2007, Free Press, 335 pages.

Most readers probably already know that in the 1800 presidential election, Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr each received an equal number of electoral votes. Because no one had a majority, the U.S. House had to choose the president. Back in 1800, each presidential elector had two votes. Electors didn’t vote for president on one ballot and then vice-president on another ballot. Instead each elector was expected to vote for the person he desired for president and also for the person he desired for vice-president.

The process by which the House chose Jefferson over Burr, after weeks of deadlock, is a riveting story, but one that is fairly well known.

But A Magnificent Catastrophe also reveals the much more obscure story that before the electors voted, a conspiracy to elect Charles Coatesworth Pinckney was underway, supported by Alexander Hamilton. Pinckney, from South Carolina, was the Federalist choice for vice-president. Hamilton worked to persuade some Federalist electors to vote for Pinckney, but not Adams, hoping that if Federalists won a majority of the electors, Pinckney would become president. Hamilton did not like Adams.

The Republicans, who were supporting Jefferson for president and Burr for vice-president, expected that the South Carolina legislators would choose electors who would vote for both Jefferson and Pinckney. Therefore, they were confident that because of South Carolina, Jefferson would receive more electoral votes than Burr. However, Pinckney himself asked all the South Carolina legislators not to choose such electors. He was loyal to Adams and felt honor-bound not to encourage the plot.

The book details this fascinating story, and also describes how in each state’s legislature, the majority party chose a method for electing presidential electors that would benefit their own party. Sixteen states were in the union, and in eleven, legislators chose the electors. The only way for the voters in these states to have any influence over the presidential election was their vote for state legislator. Early in 1800, Burr exerted all his political skills to win a Republican majority in the New York legislature, thus insuring that New York’s electors would be Republicans. The Republican Party felt so indebted to Burr that all its electors kept their word to him, and voted for Burr. If even one Republican elector had voted for Jefferson but not Burr, the party would have been far better off.

The House was controlled by Federalists, and so Jefferson was at their mercy during the House vote for President. Only after Hamilton worked to elect Jefferson over Burr was Jefferson elected.

The book is also fascinating because it shows that each state chose presidential electors on a different day, and that had a big impact on the process. In 1845 Congress passed a bill requiring all states to choose electors in November.


MODERATE CALIFORNIA GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDATE DROPS OUT

David Hadley, a former Republican legislator, and a moderate, declared his candidacy for Governor of California on July 4. However, on July 19, he said he will not run after all. He said that if he remained in the race, the chances are that no Republican would be on the ballot in November 2018, because of the top-two system that has been in effect in California starting in 2011. In 2016, with several California Republicans running in the primary for U.S. Senate, the top-two system put two Democrats, and no Republicans, on the November ballot. With such limited choices, 16.1% of all the voters who cast a ballot in November 2016 left their ballot blank for U.S. Senate.


CONGRESSIONAL BILL TO EX-FELONS

On July 27, U.S. Senator Ben Cardin (D-Md.) introduced S.1588, a bill to require states to let ex-felons register to vote. The bill would only apply to elections for federal office.


MID-2017 VOTER REGISTRATION TOTALS

~

Dem.

Rep.

Ind, misc

Lib’t.

Green

Consti.

Wk Fam

Reform

other

Alaska

76,213

140,923

275,531

7,346

1,688

389

?

?

16,864

Arizona

1,104,927

1,264,154

1,242,532

31,951

7,109

?

?

?

– –

Arkansas

79,031

83,448

1,559,211

330

39

?

?

?

– –

Calif.

8,700,440

5,027,714

4,881,441

141,461

94,720

326

?

?

586,507

Colorado

1,049,451

1,041,619

1,179,810

39,308

11,466

10,610

?

?

886

Conn.**

790,188

452,243

831,652

2,561

1,827

?

323

11

– –

Delaware

322,014

190,677

158,720

1,580

804

288

381

58

6,424

Dt. Col.

363,554

29,753

79,528

959

3,616

?

?

?

– –

Florida*

4,845,863

4,566,956

3,089,929

28,287

6,605

1,265

?

1,511

308,116

Idaho

87,897

398,110

304,119

6,347

?

2,923

?

?

– –

Iowa

610,471

656,174

707,608

9,258

2,913

0

0

0

– –

Kansas

428,381

786,719

529,702

15,473

0

0

0

0

0

Kentucky

1,680,761

1,362,094

270,256

8,004

1,766

471

?

90

112

Louis’na

1,311,976

896,549

691,153

14,414

2,570

172

0

1,326

58,610

Maine

333,817

281,815

381,398

5,495

44,285

?

?

?

– –

Maryland

2,150,688

1,017,773

724,015

20,450

9,338

?

?

?

– –

Mass.*

1,526,870

479,237

2,434,600

8,587

6,367

169

39

133

30,847

Nebraska

359,423

575,139

245,434

12,322

?

?

?

?

– –

Nevada

578,630

487,691

323,080

13,913

3,909

65,036

?

?

– –

N. Hamp.

276,817

303,328

404,717

58

?

?

?

?

– –

N. Jersey

2,090,725

1,229,116

2,343,739

7,170

4,496

4,694

?

602

9,286

N. M.

558,470

370,653

263,225

6,602

3,803

427

?

?

4,858

N. York

5,757,022

2,683,161

2,404,570

6,463

26,138

?

41,706

1,473

590,936

No. Car.

2,640,128

2,053,920

2,039,067

32,979

?

?

?

?

– –

Okla.

770,581

937,698

288,807

4,305

?

?

?

?

– –

Oregon

964,208

703,100

768,814

18,779

10,142

3,607

10,299

?

121,119

Penn.

4,051,103

3,235,781

1,105,108

46,295

12,382

1,419

?

?

– –

Rhode Is.

288,733

86,823

341,934

?

?

?

?

?

2,833

So. Dak.

168,831

254,572

125,332

1,706

?

488

?

?

– –

Utah

155,214

645,071

495,635

11,309

805

4,641

?

?

22,940

W. Va.

536,797

389,070

291,558

5,176

1,895

171

?

?

– –

Wyo.

47,125

176,336

36,109

2,389

?

797

?

?

– –

TOTAL

44,706,349

32,807,417

30,818,334

511,277

258,683

97,893

52,748

5,204

1,760,338

Percent

40.27%

29.55%

27.76%

.46%

.23%

.09%

.05%

.00+%

1.59%

The "other" column includes: Alaska is Alaskan Independence; California is 510,486 American Independent and 76,021 Peace & Freedom; Colorado is Unity; Connecticut is Independent Party; Delaware is 772 American Delta and 5,652 Independent Party; Kentucky is Socialist Workers; Louisiana is 57,771 Independent Party and 839 Conservative ; New Jersey is 5,268 Conservative, 2,137 Socialist, and 1,881 Natural Law; New Mexico is 4,163 Independent American and 695 Better for America; New York is 441,472 Independence, 146,278 Conservative, and 3,186 Women’s Equality; Oregon is 119,252 Independent Party and 1,867 Progressive; Rhode Island is Moderate; Utah is 22,900 Independent American and 40 United Utah.

Totals October 2016 were: Democratic 45,690,825 (40.60%), Republican 33,052,332 (29.37%), independent & miscellaneous 31,200,104 (27.72%), Libertarian 497,535 (.44%), Green 256,560 (.23%), Constitution 92,483 (.08%), Reform 5,294 (.00+%), Working Families 61,517 (.05%), other parties 1,662,329 (1.50%).

Totals October 2014 were: Democratic 42,755,625 (41.17%), Republican 30,938,676 (29.79%), independent & miscellaneous 27,688,850 (26.67%), Libertarian 399,302 (.38%), Green 253,267 (.24%), Constitution 78,434 (.08%), Reform 22,880 (.02%), Working Families 58,757 (.06%), other parties 1,666,473 (1.60%).

Totals October 2012 were: Dem. 43,512,746 (41.85%), Rep. 31,298,863 (30.10%), indp. & misc. 26,808,810 (25.79%), Libertarian 330,811 (.32%), Green 250,682 (.24%), Constitution 77,918 (.07%), Reform 22,880 (.02%), Americans Elect 6,408 (.01%), other parties 1,659,537 (1.60%).

Totals October 2008 were: Dem. 43,933,901 (43.62%), Rep. 30,944,590 (30.72%), indp. & misc. 24,157,259 (23.98%), AIP/Constitution 438,222 (.44%), Green 255,019 (.25%), Libertarian 240,328 (.24%), Reform 32,961 (.03%), other parties 675,980 (.67%).

Totals October 2004 were: Dem. 37,301,951 (42.19%), Rep. 28,988,593 (32.79%), indp. & misc. 20,471,250 (23.15%), Constitution 320,019 (.36%), Green 298,701 (.34%), Libertarian 235,521 (.27%), Reform 63,729 (.07%), Natural Law 39,670 (.04%), other parties 695,639 (.79%). See page one for more about this chart. This is the first chart that BAN has ever prepared, showing registration data in an odd year. Even-year registration charts have been in BAN starting in 1992.


2017 PARTY REVENUE FROM STATE INCOME TAX "CHECK-OFF"

The chart below shows the amount of money sent to political parties, in the states that let state income-taxpayers choose a political party to help. The chart shows these amounts for 2017. Numbers are in real dollars.

~

Demo.

Rep.

Lib’t.

Constitn

Green

Wk Fam

Ind. Party

other

Alabama

6,725

8,553

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

Arizona

15,199

10,056

382

– –

326

– –

– –

– –

Iowa

40,262

28,234

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

Kentucky

64,554

89,006

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

Minn.

29,158

12,973

830

– –

1,272

– –

1,590

1,024

N. Mex.

5,592

2,454

504

20

328

– –

– –

200

Ohio

31,639

31,639

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

Oregon

6,111

1,056

294

123

576

531

564

252

Rhode I.

9,160

3,166

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

440

Utah

42,102

45,068

5,416

2,190

– –

– –

– –

4,180

Virginia

10,900

3,473

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

– –

TOTAL

261,402

235,678

7,426

2,333

2,502

531

2,154

6,096

Entries in "Other" column are: Minn., Grassroots $351 & Legalize Marijuana Now $673; New Mexico, Better for America; Oregon, Progressive; Rhode Island, Moderate; Utah, Independent American.


PARTY REVENUE FROM STATE INCOME TAX “CHECK-OFF” FOR THE ENTIRE NATION THROUGH HISTORY, 2000-2017

YEAR

Democrat

Republican

Green

Lib’t.

Ref/AE

Constit.

Other

2000

941,463

822,671

31,864

13,024

5,054

19,209

71,824

2001

680,608

611,065

12,184

8,173

755

2,295

46,232

2002

928,716

892,438

84,120

7,289

749

2,886

97,559

2003

1,181,312

1,126,585

20,665

7,859

46

51

9,975

2004

828,136

786,190

16,309

8,446

324

1,409

8,822

2005

750,461

714,238

18,100

5,546

34

2,442

25,887

2006

915,945

806,193

50,434

7,282

– –

5,847

45,355

2007

1,050,593

850,580

15,716

5,839

– –

3,503

15,627

2008

1,520,746

1,127,478

8,324

5,034

– –

5,938

5,219

2009

978,325

718,165

7,642

45,889

– –

4,520

4,970

2010

830,562

616,027

5,257

11,115

– –

3,617

5,630

2011

850,490

603,022

6,560

53,133

– –

4,367

11,766

2012

1,883,507

1,245,403

7,862

101,253

– –

2,458

8,733

2013

740,897

545,527

4,041

22,438

11,516

2,816

21,430

2014

369,153

324,042

1,836

7,418

817

3,041

3,175

2015

280,223

246,396

1,777

7,263

174

2,455

12,078

2016

275,908

231,102

3,517

6,636

561

2,428

6,229

2017

261,402

235,678

2,502

7,426

– –

2,333

8,781



NEBRASKA SENATOR WILL FORM NEW POLITICAL PARTY

On July 20, Nebraska State Senator Bob Krist said he plans to create a new political party in his own state, and then to seek that party’s gubernatorial nomination in 2018. He said the name of the party will probably be "Unity", or "Unification", or "Centrist." He has been a Republican but is dissatisfied with the Republican legislators and the Republican Governor.


U.S. SENATE COMMITTEE WANTS TO KNOW ABOUT JILL STEIN

The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee has asked Donald Trump, Jr., and Paul Manafort, President Trump’s original campaign manager, to disclose any communications they have had with 40 individuals. One of those individuals is Jill Stein, the 2016 Green presidential nominee.


LOUISIANA ELECTION

Louisiana holds a special election for Treasurer on October 7, 2017. There are four Republicans, one Democrat, one Libertarian, and one independent on the ballot. If no one gets a majority there will be a run-off in November.


LIBERTARIANS GAIN OFFICE-HOLDERS IN NEW YORK AND MISSISSIPPI

On June 6, a member of the Libertarian Party, Steve McCluskey, was elected Mayor of McLain, Mississippi. The town has partisan elections for city office, but generally candidates run as independents so as to spare the expense of party primaries. McCluskey defeated the incumbent as well as a third candidate.

On July 2, Mike Becallo, an elected town councilor in Cicero, New York, said that he had changed his registration from Republican to Libertarian. The town has partisan elections.


LIBERTARIAN PARTY NOW BALLOT-QUALIFIED IN ARKANSAS

On July 7, the Arkansas Secretary of State said the Libertarian Party petition for party status has enough valid signatures. The requirement is 10,000. The party is now a qualified party in 39 states plus D.C. However, in Georgia the party is only on for statewide office, not district or county office; and in Connecticut it is only on for some offices, but not others. The eleven states in which the party is not qualified are Alabama, Illinois, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington.


ELLIOT TRAIMAN, LONG-TIME COFOE BOARD MEMBER, DIES

On July 7, Elliot Traiman, a long-time board member for the Coalition for Free & Open Elections (COFOE), died unexpectedly. He was 61 and lived in Long Beach, New York. He had been co-treasurer of COFOE, serving with his companion Alice Kelsey. Elliot and Alice had been with COFOE since it was founded in 1985. As recently as March, 2017, Elliot had been to this year’s Board meeting. All members of the board are saddened by his death.


VIRGINIA 2017 ELECTION

Virginia elects its Governor, and also 100 members of the lower house of the legislature, on November 7, 2017. There are 13 districts with no Democratic nominee; there are 28 districts with no Republican nominee. It is unusual for Virginia Democrats to have more legislative nominees than Republicans. There are also Green Party nominees in five districts, and Libertarians in four districts. There are no Independent Green nominees. The Independent Green Party exists only in Virginia and in recent years has had more candidates than any other minor party. In the gubernatorial race, there are only three candidates: a Republican, a Democrat, and a Libertarian.


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