New York Won't Ask for Rehearing in Judicial Ballot Access Case

The New York State Board of Elections will not ask for a rehearing, or a rehearing en banc, in the 2nd circuit, in the Lopez Torres case. This is the case in which both the U.S. District Court, and the 2nd circuit, had ruled that ballot access is too difficult for candidates trying to get on major party primary ballots for Delegate to Judicial Nominating Conventions (these party meetings choose party candidates for New York Supreme Court seats). The law required 75,000 signatures of party members who were trying to get a full slate of delegates on primary ballots, in the whole state.

However, the State Board of Elections may ask for the U.S. Supreme Court to review the case, but that decision need not be made until December.

New York Won’t Ask for Rehearing in Judicial Ballot Access Case

The New York State Board of Elections will not ask for a rehearing, or a rehearing en banc, in the 2nd circuit, in the Lopez Torres case. This is the case in which both the U.S. District Court, and the 2nd circuit, had ruled that ballot access is too difficult for candidates trying to get on major party primary ballots for Delegate to Judicial Nominating Conventions (these party meetings choose party candidates for New York Supreme Court seats). The law required 75,000 signatures of party members who were trying to get a full slate of delegates on primary ballots, in the whole state.

However, the State Board of Elections may ask for the U.S. Supreme Court to review the case, but that decision need not be made until December.

Ohio Independent Congressional Candidate Loses Lawsuit

On September 12, U.S. District Court Judge George C. Smith, of Columbus, Ohio, refused to grant an injunction putting Charlie Morrison on the ballot as an independent candidate for U.S. House, 15th district. Morrison is appealing.

He turned in enough valid signatures, but he was kept off the ballot because he had run for Republican Party committee member in this year’s primary, and had also voted in this year’s primary. Ohio does not have registration by party, and the law is vague about who may or may not qualify to be an independent candidate. Ironically, the Green Party nominee for Governor of Ohio this year also voted in a major party primary, and he is on the ballot as an independent candidate. No one challenged his ballot status.

Working Families has 5 South Carolina Nominations

The Working Families Party, appearing on the ballot in South Carolina this year for the first time, has nominated 5 candidates. They include two for US House of Representatives, 2 for the state legislature, and one for county commissioner in Charleston County. All five are also Democratic nominees. The state will tally the votes each receives under each party label.

Working Families Party candidates will thus appear on the ballot in three states this November: South Carolina, Connecticut and New York. Although the party is also ballot-qualified in Oregon and Delaware, it has no candidates in those two states.

Pro-Minor Party Author, Attorney Wins Democratic Primary for Maryland Legislative Seat

On September 12, Jamie Raskin won his Democratic primary race for a seat in the Maryland State Senate, defeating the incumbent Democratic Senator.

Raskin is an attorney who represented an independent candidate in the only U.S. Supreme Court case over entry to candidate debates (Arkansas Educational TV v Forbes). Raskin also represented the Reform Party in the 9th circuit in 1998, in a challenge to a federal public campaign funding law that provides unequal general election funding to parties that got over 5%, but under 25%, of the last presidential vote. He also wrote “Overruling Democracy”, a book that criticizes the U.S. Supreme Court’s hostility toward minor parties and independent candidates.